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Fruit is an important part of a healthy diet. However Jones (2010 p, 12) states that people are eating less fruit because it is becoming more expensive. This paper will argue that one way of combating the rising price of fruit is for local council's to plant more fruit trees in local parks and public areas. Firstly, the paper will identify key terms in the literature around food prices. Secondly, the paper will focus on fruit, and examine its role in healthy diets and evaluate recent consumption of fruit. Finally I will use my personal reflection of the current situation in my home town to explore a possible response. The rise of food prices in the last five years is indisputable. Jones (2010) makes it clear that across Australia the price of food has increased more than people's wages have increased which makes it difficult for people to access food the way they did five years ago. Doolan (2012) highlights that fresh food, in particular fruit, has been the most effected. She claims that the price of nonperishable items such as flour and sugar have increased by only 5% while the price of fruit and vegetables have increased by 20% (Doolan 2012, p 4). This kind of price rise is what food theorists such as Manhood (2011) call a "perishable price hike", which is when the price of fresh food like fruit and vegetables increases further than the price of non-perishable items. According to some authors (Leah & Cameron, 2011) the perishable price hike we are currently experiencing in Australia has to do with what they call the "diminishing farmer population". This means that as farmers get old and retire, they are not being replaced by younger ones and therefore there are fewer farmers growing food in the country (Leah & Cameron, 2011). Because there is less food grown, Australia is forced to purchase food grown overseas which is more expensive and therefore raises the price of food that we see on the shelves. Perishable items such as fruit and vegetables require refrigerated transport, unlike sugar and wheat, and the costs associated with refrigerated transport are much higher (Leah & Cameron, 2011). Current fresh fruit consumption trends suggest that this perishable price hike is having a negative impact on health. One report, based on interviews with 500 people, states that on average people are eating half as much fruit as they were 5 years ago (Mike, 2009). In addition, in another study (Jones, 2010) it was reported that shops are selling half as much fruit as they were 5 years ago. These two reports clearly demonstrate that people are eating much less fruit than they were five years ago before the perishable price hike started. Health experts (Dan 2012, and Bee 2013) indicate that this drop in consumption of fruit will have negative impacts on the community. They claim that fruit is a great way to access essential vitamins and minerals (Dan, 2012) and that if people are not getting these vitamins and minerals then the health impacts could be devastating. Bee (2013) states that in the last five years more people have become severely debilitated by even the common cold because of a lack of vitamin C in their diet. She goes on to say that the food people are buying, like flour and sugar, does not have the vitamin C that people need to stay healthy. Murray (2013) says that more economic development is needed so that people can have access to the money they need to buy the food to keep them healthy. But the health experts suggest that this will not be a solution. Bee (2013) says people need a regular reliable source of food, and that we cannot rely on imported fruit and vegetables to provide perishable goods. If the source of food is the problem, then I would like to discuss my experience of growing up in regional NSW as a possible solution. In my home town there were many fruit trees planted in the parks and along the streets. They were was planted during WWII as people feared there would be food shortages as a result of the War. There are many different types of fruits - oranges, lemons, cherries, apples and pears. There is enough of a variety of fruits that there is always something in season. Our family will often walk down to the park to get our fruit, especially since fruit in the shops is so expensive. I wouldn't say that people are eating as much fruit as they were five years ago, because there are not enough trees in the town to supply everyone, but people do have enough fruit to get by. I also think it is nice in my town, that when you harvest fruit from a tree, you get the chance to talk to someone. Smith (2004) says that talking to people in your community has positive health benefits because people feel a sense of community. So I think that the fruit trees in our town are not just good for our diets, but for community health as well. I think that if the rest of Australia followed my town's fruit tree planting example, then people would have a way of accessing fruit without having to buy it. Because of the "diminishing farmer population", Australia is currently experiencing a rise in the cost of food in particular a "perishable price hike". The evidence suggests that as a result of this people are not eating as much fruit as they were five years ago. This change in how much fruit people are eating is having a negative impact on health as people are now being severely affected by things like the common cold. Some authors say economic development is needed to give people more money but others say this won't work and the source of food needs to change. I have suggested that planting fruit trees in parks and along the streets will change the source of food and give people a greater access to fruit and help reverse the negative health impacts we are seeing as a result of the perishable price hike.
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Essay: The Perishable Price Hike of Australia
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Essay: The Perishable Price Hike Of Australia

Words: 1005    Pages: 4    Paragraphs: 9    Sentences: 43    Read Time: 03:39
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              Fruit is an important part of a healthy diet. However Jones (2010 p, 12) states that people are eating less fruit because it is becoming more expensive. This paper will argue that one way of combating the rising price of fruit is for local council's to plant more fruit trees in local parks and public areas. Firstly, the paper will identify key terms in the literature around food prices. Secondly, the paper will focus on fruit, and examine its role in healthy diets and evaluate recent consumption of fruit. Finally I will use my personal reflection of the current situation in my home town to explore a possible response.
             
              The rise of food prices in the last five years is indisputable. Jones (2010) makes it clear that across Australia the price of food has increased more than people's wages have increased which makes it difficult for people to access food the way they did five years ago. Doolan (2012) highlights that fresh food, in particular fruit, has been the most effected. She claims that the price of nonperishable items such as flour and sugar have increased by only 5% while the price of fruit and vegetables have increased by 20% (Doolan 2012, p 4). This kind of price rise is what food theorists such as Manhood (2011) call a "perishable price hike", which is when the price of fresh food like fruit and vegetables increases further than the price of non-perishable items.
             
              According to some authors (Leah & Cameron, 2011) the perishable price hike we are currently experiencing in Australia has to do with what they call the "diminishing farmer population". This means that as farmers get old and retire, they are not being replaced by younger ones and therefore there are fewer farmers growing food in the country (Leah & Cameron, 2011). Because there is less food grown, Australia is forced to purchase food grown overseas which is more expensive and therefore raises the price of food that we see on the shelves. Perishable items such as fruit and vegetables require refrigerated transport, unlike sugar and wheat, and the costs associated with refrigerated transport are much higher (Leah & Cameron, 2011).
             
              Current fresh fruit consumption trends suggest that this perishable price hike is having a negative impact on health. One report, based on interviews with 500 people, states that on average people are eating half as much fruit as they were 5 years ago (Mike, 2009). In addition, in another study (Jones, 2010) it was reported that shops are selling half as much fruit as they were 5 years ago. These two reports clearly demonstrate that people are eating much less fruit than they were five years ago before the perishable price hike started.
             
              Health experts (Dan 2012, and Bee 2013) indicate that this drop in consumption of fruit will have negative impacts on the community. They claim that fruit is a great way to access essential vitamins and minerals (Dan, 2012) and that if people are not getting these vitamins and minerals then the health impacts could be devastating. Bee (2013) states that in the last five years more people have become severely debilitated by even the common cold because of a lack of vitamin C in their diet. She goes on to say that the food people are buying, like flour and sugar, does not have the vitamin C that people need to stay healthy.
             
              Murray (2013) says that more economic development is needed so that people can have access to the money they need to buy the food to keep them healthy. But the health experts suggest that this will not be a solution. Bee (2013) says people need a regular reliable source of food, and that we cannot rely on imported fruit and vegetables to provide perishable goods. If the source of food is the problem, then I would like to discuss my experience of growing up in regional NSW as a possible solution.
             
              In my home town there were many fruit trees planted in the parks and along the streets. They were was planted during WWII as people feared there would be food shortages as a result of the War. There are many different types of fruits - oranges, lemons, cherries, apples and pears. There is enough of a variety of fruits that there is always something in season. Our family will often walk down to the park to get our fruit, especially since fruit in the shops is so expensive. I wouldn't say that people are eating as much fruit as they were five years ago, because there are not enough trees in the town to supply everyone, but people do have enough fruit to get by.
             
              I also think it is nice in my town, that when you harvest fruit from a tree, you get the chance to talk to someone. Smith (2004) says that talking to people in your community has positive health benefits because people feel a sense of community. So I think that the fruit trees in our town are not just good for our diets, but for community health as well. I think that if the rest of Australia followed my town's fruit tree planting example, then people would have a way of accessing fruit without having to buy it.
             
              Because of the "diminishing farmer population", Australia is currently experiencing a rise in the cost of food in particular a "perishable price hike". The evidence suggests that as a result of this people are not eating as much fruit as they were five years ago. This change in how much fruit people are eating is having a negative impact on health as people are now being severely affected by things like the common cold. Some authors say economic development is needed to give people more money but others say this won't work and the source of food needs to change. I have suggested that planting fruit trees in parks and along the streets will change the source of food and give people a greater access to fruit and help reverse the negative health impacts we are seeing as a result of the perishable price hike.
Academic Essay 
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Referencess.
Bee, M. (2013) Keeping healthy. In American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 10(7), 14-18.
Dan, J. (2012). Impact of diet on health. In Dietetics Australia, 34(5), 4-9.
Doolan, C. (2012). The economics of Australia Farming. London, Sydney, New York: Routledge.
Jones, P. (2010). Food Security in Australia. The Market Gardeners Monthly, 32(6), 47-56.
Leah, M., & Cameron, S. (2011). The agricultural sector on the move. Horticulture Australia, 78(4), 41-54.
Manhood, J. (2011). Economics in Action. Sydney, Perth: Silverdale Publishing.
Mike, W. (2009). Where to from here for our fruit producers? Fresh Produce Journal, 12(3) 17-21.
Murray, L. (2013). Australians on the brink. Economics Today, 12(1) 56-66.
Smith, G. (2004). The health benefits of community gardens. Psychology Today, 33(12), 45-49.
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