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A mom drives home from work around four p.m. on the major road in her hometown and stops at a light that turns red. While passing the time, she scans the immediate area, finding a large black truck sitting next to her. In the bed of the truck is a golden retriever, panting happily and alert. She cannot help smiling. The light turns green, and the cars shuffle as everyone accelerates. At the next red light, the car in front of the woman and to the right has a small, tan terrier head sticking out of the back window, tongue out. She can see a small child's hand stroking the fur. She cannot help thinking that this particular dog is significant. The mom turns on the road she lives on and slows down as children play before dinner. A neighbor jogs by, waving with the hand that does not hold the trotting dog's leash. A young girl sits on her porch, reading in the shade on a chair swing, her orange tabby lying curled up next to her. The cat's tail jumps softly back and forth, its eyes shut, betraying her movements. Two boys, one a teenager and the other just coming out of the single digits, throw a tennis ball across the green grass, a tall and fit American bulldog eagerly chasing after it and bringing is back loyally. The woman pulls on her driveway and walks into her house. As she closes the front door, a small, clear ball flies by, the family hamster operating it. Her sons fly by, chasing after the little black creature. In the kitchen, she finds her husband and small daughter cooking dinner and greeting her happily, the family dachshund wiggling with excitement at her presence. In the United States alone, 62% of households own a pet, with 77 million dogs and 93 million cats (McConnell 1239). Pets are a major asset to countless households worldwide. For centuries, human beings have had connections with animals whether it is for a source of food or a source of comfort. Humans used the animal to hunt and eat, but would also use the animal to make clothes, shelters, and even weapons for hunting. Animals became a staple in a voluminous amount to people's lives, providing sources of nutrition and helping bring animals and humans closer. Humans respected all animals because of what they had provided for them. The Egyptians loved their cats so much that they would mummify and bury the cats with their owners after death (Rosebrock 12). But, as people grew into more of an industrialized society, animals became only a food source, being manipulated to satisfy human needs. Now, animals are a massive part of the family unit, providing unconditional love and comfort for people with the world's current struggles. Are pets really that helpful to their owners? Animals are special to humans because they aid their owners in overcoming their problems. People should own a pet because research and observation shows that there are positive effects on people's mental health, physical health, medical health, and personality. Research shows that pets have a positive influence on people's mental health. They become a social source for depressed patients, filling in the void of social isolation that is most common among depressed people. Karen Dineen Wagner, a psychologist with a doctorate in clinical psychology, wrote the article "Children and Pets: a Winning Combination" in the Psychiatric Times. She writes that one teenager she treated stated that "his dog was his lifeline in the midst of his despair from depression" (1). Animals, dogs especially, provide the unconditional love and support that at times people cannot provide to the morose person. And even more so, they (pets) can be a companion to a person throughout their depressive state until the individual can better themselves at social interaction. Moreover, pets also slate off negative feelings and give pet owners greater self-esteem than non-pet owners. Research shows that pet owners feel more self-regard and are less lonely and depressed with the presence of their pets. Allen McConnell and colleagues wrote "Friends with benefits: On the positive consequences of pet ownership," published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. McConnell and his colleagues studied how college students, in a random survey, felt about themselves and their lives whether they owned a pet or not. Results show that students who owned a pet or thought about the pet they have at home had more self-esteem, greater subjective happiness, less loneliness, and less perceived stress than the non-pet owners surveyed (1247). I can recall that when I feel stressed or have a pressing issue that I do not want to talk to anyone else about, having a dog to listen to me and get it out of my system helps. They will sit there and listen, not interrupting with advice that does not help me or that makes me feel more stressed. My pets are another source of companionship for me. Pets provide another support system apart from human encouragement. Similarly, pet owners benefit physically from their pets as well as psychologically. Due to most animals needing exercise, like dogs and horses, people inadvertently benefit from physical activity from their pets. Research shows that dog ownership correlates to an increase in adolescent activity. In one research study, 618 adolescents, with or without a pet, participated in seven days of activity with an accelerometer. The results show that adolescents with a pet spent more time in a moderate to vigorous activity state than young adolescents without a pet (Dineen 30). I am more active than I usually would be when I get around my pets. They get me on the floor to play, run around with them outside, or simply more lively because they are energetic. Whether it is going on a walk or getting low on the floor to play with one's pet, the owners are gaining physical activity without seeking it. Pets decrease the need to go to the doctor because they benefit people's medical health. It is scientifically proven that people's medical health are positively benefited by their pets. Erin Rosebrock, the writer of the article "Wild about Animals! Pets and Beyond," is in the magazine New Moon Girls. Rosebrock explains a study done by Karen Allen, a professor at the University of Buffalo, in which she measured the blood pressure of stockbrokers by giving all the stockbrokers' blood pressure medicine with half of those sampled also assigned a pet. After six months, she found that the stockbrokers with pets have lower blood pressure levels than the stockbrokers who only received the blood pressure medicine (12). Owning a pet shows that one can reduce their stress that is a cause of working people to have high blood pressure. The results demonstrate that pets do have an impact on people's health than just taking medicine to keep one from having to visit a doctor. Experiments show that stress, which a good deal of times is the main cause for people getting sick, is reduced significantly with the presence of animals. Furthermore, with low levels of stress, cholesterol, and blood pressure in an individual, it results in fewer doctor visits. Angela Hynes states in her article, "The Healing Power of Animals," located in the Natural Health magazine, "owning a pet can reduce blood pressure, heart rate, and cholesterol; lower triglyceride levels; lessen stress; results in fewer doctor visits..." (72). Research shows that infants who are exposed to animals, like cats and dogs, at a young age are less likely to develop allergies later on in life (72). With fewer doctor visits, more money and time can be saved for the individual. Many people do suffer from allergies because they had not been exposed to animals early on in life. If infants are exposed to animals and it lessens their chance of contracting allergies as they get older. This would result in fewer doctor visits in the future for medicine and shots during allergy season. Pets also have the ability to instill certain qualities into their owners. Pets need a lot of care. They bring out humanities's caring nature and the love of people to have something to take care of. Like Karen Dineen states in her article, "...pets bring out our humanity in a unique way" (30). They can cause some uncaring people to be more loving in nature. Pets teach their owners how to take responsibility for another living creature and how to organize their time better. Taking care of animals also helps calm some personalities because animals provide a sense of safety and comfort. Animals can help change people's personalities and reactions for the better. However, people can make the argument that pets are expensive and need a great deal of time to take care of their needs. Pets are a costly investment for anyone to handle, from having to buy pet food at least once every two months to a visit to the vet that can end up causing expensive bills. Numerous pets cost a fortune just to initially obtain and then there are further costs as Eve Mitchell states in her article, "Pets require both 'Start up' and 'Ongoing' Costs" located in the Tribune-Review/ Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. "...[having a pet is] going to have start-up costs and ongoing costs" (Mitchell). Once obtaining a pet, the new owner has to fret about vaccinations, food, toys, beds, training, and how the pet is going to be taken care of during the persons work hours. Another opposing opinion to owning a pet is the fact that some are unpredictable in behavior. One day an animal can be sweet ,but the next day they could attack their owner or another person. Many animals can also end up being euthanized because the owners leave them once they discover that they cannot support the animal as needed. Many animal shelters have a surplus of homeless pets and many people end up not wanting shelter pets because they do not know how the previous owners raised them (the animals). People want to start with a puppy. This causes unnecessary euthanizations of animals and animal rights' groups protest the wrongness of the act, but these issues do not deter most people from owning a pet. Nonetheless, pets are contributors to the lives of people, making life more bearable and fun. Animals have been coexisting allies for centuries ranging from the prehistoric times to the modern-day culture we thrive in. Research studies suggest that pets can make life easier by being a presence in ones life and actually make one more healthy. People should try at some point to own a pet if they have the financial support and loving time to take care of a furry friend. Individuals can own older pets from pounds and shelters too. The first dog I got was a rescue pet and she brought my life joy in the time she had been with my family and me. To own a pet, one can look up online or visit a local shelter to check out the dogs, cats, and sometimes other big and small creatures to integrate into their family.
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Benefits of Owning Pets
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Benefits Of Owning Pets

Words: 1865    Pages: 7    Paragraphs: 9    Sentences: 106    Read Time: 06:46
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              A mom drives home from work around four p. m. on the major road in her hometown and stops at a light that turns red. While passing the time, she scans the immediate area, finding a large black truck sitting next to her. In the bed of the truck is a golden retriever, panting happily and alert. She cannot help smiling. The light turns green, and the cars shuffle as everyone accelerates. At the next red light, the car in front of the woman and to the right has a small, tan terrier head sticking out of the back window, tongue out. She can see a small child's hand stroking the fur. She cannot help thinking that this particular dog is significant. The mom turns on the road she lives on and slows down as children play before dinner. A neighbor jogs by, waving with the hand that does not hold the trotting dog's leash. A young girl sits on her porch, reading in the shade on a chair swing, her orange tabby lying curled up next to her. The cat's tail jumps softly back and forth, its eyes shut, betraying her movements. Two boys, one a teenager and the other just coming out of the single digits, throw a tennis ball across the green grass, a tall and fit American bulldog eagerly chasing after it and bringing is back loyally. The woman pulls on her driveway and walks into her house. As she closes the front door, a small, clear ball flies by, the family hamster operating it. Her sons fly by, chasing after the little black creature. In the kitchen, she finds her husband and small daughter cooking dinner and greeting her happily, the family dachshund wiggling with excitement at her presence. In the United States alone, 62% of households own a pet, with 77 million dogs and 93 million cats (McConnell 1239). Pets are a major asset to countless households worldwide.
              For centuries, human beings have had connections with animals whether it is for a source of food or a source of comfort. Humans used the animal to hunt and eat, but would also use the animal to make clothes, shelters, and even weapons for hunting. Animals became a staple in a voluminous amount to people's lives, providing sources of nutrition and helping bring animals and humans closer. Humans respected all animals because of what they had provided for them. The Egyptians loved their cats so much that they would mummify and bury the cats with their owners after death (Rosebrock 12). But, as people grew into more of an industrialized society, animals became only a food source, being manipulated to satisfy human needs. Now, animals are a massive part of the family unit, providing unconditional love and comfort for people with the world's current struggles. Are pets really that helpful to their owners? Animals are special to humans because they aid their owners in overcoming their problems. People should own a pet because research and observation shows that there are positive effects on people's mental health, physical health, medical health, and personality.
             
              Research shows that pets have a positive influence on people's mental health. They become a social source for depressed patients, filling in the void of social isolation that is most common among depressed people. Karen Dineen Wagner, a psychologist with a doctorate in clinical psychology, wrote the article "Children and Pets: a Winning Combination" in the Psychiatric Times. She writes that one teenager she treated stated that "his dog was his lifeline in the midst of his despair from depression" (1). Animals, dogs especially, provide the unconditional love and support that at times people cannot provide to the morose person. And even more so, they (pets) can be a companion to a person throughout their depressive state until the individual can better themselves at social interaction.
              Moreover, pets also slate off negative feelings and give pet owners greater self-esteem than non-pet owners. Research shows that pet owners feel more self-regard and are less lonely and depressed with the presence of their pets. Allen McConnell and colleagues wrote "Friends with benefits: On the positive consequences of pet ownership," published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. McConnell and his colleagues studied how college students, in a random survey, felt about themselves and their lives whether they owned a pet or not. Results show that students who owned a pet or thought about the pet they have at home had more self-esteem, greater subjective happiness, less loneliness, and less perceived stress than the non-pet owners surveyed (1247). I can recall that when I feel stressed or have a pressing issue that I do not want to talk to anyone else about, having a dog to listen to me and get it out of my system helps. They will sit there and listen, not interrupting with advice that does not help me or that makes me feel more stressed. My pets are another source of companionship for me. Pets provide another support system apart from human encouragement.
             
              Similarly, pet owners benefit physically from their pets as well as psychologically. Due to most animals needing exercise, like dogs and horses, people inadvertently benefit from physical activity from their pets. Research shows that dog ownership correlates to an increase in adolescent activity. In one research study, 618 adolescents, with or without a pet, participated in seven days of activity with an accelerometer. The results show that adolescents with a pet spent more time in a moderate to vigorous activity state than young adolescents without a pet (Dineen 30). I am more active than I usually would be when I get around my pets. They get me on the floor to play, run around with them outside, or simply more lively because they are energetic. Whether it is going on a walk or getting low on the floor to play with one's pet, the owners are gaining physical activity without seeking it.
             
              Pets decrease the need to go to the doctor because they benefit people's medical health. It is scientifically proven that people's medical health are positively benefited by their pets. Erin Rosebrock, the writer of the article "Wild about Animals! Pets and Beyond," is in the magazine New Moon Girls. Rosebrock explains a study done by Karen Allen, a professor at the University of Buffalo, in which she measured the blood pressure of stockbrokers by giving all the stockbrokers' blood pressure medicine with half of those sampled also assigned a pet. After six months, she found that the stockbrokers with pets have lower blood pressure levels than the stockbrokers who only received the blood pressure medicine (12). Owning a pet shows that one can reduce their stress that is a cause of working people to have high blood pressure. The results demonstrate that pets do have an impact on people's health than just taking medicine to keep one from having to visit a doctor. Experiments show that stress, which a good deal of times is the main cause for people getting sick, is reduced significantly with the presence of animals. Furthermore, with low levels of stress, cholesterol, and blood pressure in an individual, it results in fewer doctor visits. Angela Hynes states in her article, "The Healing Power of Animals," located in the Natural Health magazine, "owning a pet can reduce blood pressure, heart rate, and cholesterol; lower triglyceride levels; lessen stress; results in fewer doctor visits. . . " (72). Research shows that infants who are exposed to animals, like cats and dogs, at a young age are less likely to develop allergies later on in life (72). With fewer doctor visits, more money and time can be saved for the individual. Many people do suffer from allergies because they had not been exposed to animals early on in life. If infants are exposed to animals and it lessens their chance of contracting allergies as they get older. This would result in fewer doctor visits in the future for medicine and shots during allergy season.
             
              Pets also have the ability to instill certain qualities into their owners. Pets need a lot of care. They bring out humanities's caring nature and the love of people to have something to take care of. Like Karen Dineen states in her article, ". . . pets bring out our humanity in a unique way" (30). They can cause some uncaring people to be more loving in nature. Pets teach their owners how to take responsibility for another living creature and how to organize their time better. Taking care of animals also helps calm some personalities because animals provide a sense of safety and comfort. Animals can help change people's personalities and reactions for the better.
             
              However, people can make the argument that pets are expensive and need a great deal of time to take care of their needs. Pets are a costly investment for anyone to handle, from having to buy pet food at least once every two months to a visit to the vet that can end up causing expensive bills. Numerous pets cost a fortune just to initially obtain and then there are further costs as Eve Mitchell states in her article, "Pets require both 'Start up' and 'Ongoing' Costs" located in the Tribune-Review/ Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. ". . . [having a pet is] going to have start-up costs and ongoing costs" (Mitchell). Once obtaining a pet, the new owner has to fret about vaccinations, food, toys, beds, training, and how the pet is going to be taken care of during the persons work hours. Another opposing opinion to owning a pet is the fact that some are unpredictable in behavior. One day an animal can be sweet ,but the next day they could attack their owner or another person. Many animals can also end up being euthanized because the owners leave them once they discover that they cannot support the animal as needed. Many animal shelters have a surplus of homeless pets and many people end up not wanting shelter pets because they do not know how the previous owners raised them (the animals). People want to start with a puppy. This causes unnecessary euthanizations of animals and animal rights' groups protest the wrongness of the act, but these issues do not deter most people from owning a pet.
             
              Nonetheless, pets are contributors to the lives of people, making life more bearable and fun. Animals have been coexisting allies for centuries ranging from the prehistoric times to the modern-day culture we thrive in. Research studies suggest that pets can make life easier by being a presence in ones life and actually make one more healthy. People should try at some point to own a pet if they have the financial support and loving time to take care of a furry friend. Individuals can own older pets from pounds and shelters too. The first dog I got was a rescue pet and she brought my life joy in the time she had been with my family and me. To own a pet, one can look up online or visit a local shelter to check out the dogs, cats, and sometimes other big and small creatures to integrate into their family.
Pets Essay 
+2
1. Hynes, Angela. "The Healing Power of Animals." Natural Health. 35.3 (March 2005): 72-77. EBSCOhost. Web. 20 October 2013.
2. McConnell, Allen R. et al. "Friends with Benefits: On the Positive Consequences of Pet Ownership." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 101.6 (December 2011): 1239- 1252. EBSCOhost. Web. 31 October 2013.
3. Mitchell, Eve. "Pets require both 'Start up' and 'Ongoing' Costs." Tribune- Review/ Pittsburgh Tribune- Review. (2010). ProQuest. Web. 28 October 2013.
4. Rosebrock, Erin, Lulu Talmadge. "Wild about Animals! Pets and Beyond." New Moon Girls. 19.4 (March/April): 12-13. ProQuest. Web. 27 October 2013.
5. Wagner, Karen Dineen. "Children and Pets: A Winning Combination." Psychiatric Times. 28.11 (November 2011): 30. ProQuest. Web. 22 October 2013.
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