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Working. Reading. Eating. Music. Sports. Entertainment. Everybody has a pleasure in life. There are different kinds of pleasure and everyone can experience different amounts of pleasure at a time. However, reading provides the best kind of pleasure among all since it also gives us knowledge, experience, inspiration, information and mental refreshment. Regardless of the purposes, reading has always been metaphorically considered "a window to the world", meaning that it gives us a broader understanding of the world. There was a doctor named Doctor Seuss who once said, "The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go." Hence, I believe that the habit of reading needs to be cultivated. Childhood is usually the best period when it should be started because the younger a child is, the more quickly they can learn to read. Unfortunately, today most of the modern students use the Internet more and read books for getting through the tests only. The statistics released by the U.S. Education Department also shows that about 14% of U.S. adults cannot read. It is sad that the crisis of adult literacy is getting worse while in the world of today we really need this skill. A person needs to be literate to a certain level for him to function in the society. In the texts by Sherman Alexie, "The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me" and Nicholas Carr's "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" they state how reading from printed works such as books and magazines and reading from the Internet differ. In Alexie's essay, he tells about how reading books at an early age has enabled him to grow up to be a smart and successful Indian while on the contrary, Carr tells about how reading on the Internet has robbed away his ability to read books and focus on long pieces reading instead. We may use different types of media to learn to read. However, it is important to know that the media we use in learning may play an important part in shaping our thoughts. In "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" Nicholas Carr repeatedly mentions how the Internet becomes his and many people's medium today to learn and access information. In fact, "the Internet, an immeasurably powerful computing system, is subsuming most of our other intellectual technologies. It's becoming our map and our clock, our printing press and our typewriter, our calculator and our telephone, and our radio and our TV" (page 96.) Looking at how the Internet we know today has a lot of functions, it is predicted that the Internet will continue to have larger impact on the cognition in the future. "Never has a communications system (the Internet) played so many roles in our lives - or exerted such broad influence over our thoughts - as the Internet does today" (page 97.) However, while Carr uses the Internet as his learning tool, Sherman Alexie still uses traditional media such as books and anything that has text on it to learn to read. "I can remember picking up my father's books before I could read. The words themselves were mostly foreign, but I still remember the exact moment when I first understood, with a sudden clarity, the purpose of a paragraph" (page 16.) In the illustration, he tries to explain how he taught himself at an early age before he could even read and advances quickly, which makes him, as an Indian growing up in the reservation, feel proud of himself. Learning from books and using the Internet carry their own advantages and disadvantages. Even though Carr believes that learning through the Internet provides more immediacy and efficiency than books, however it comes with price. It is true that "the more pieces we can "access" and the faster we can extract their gist, the more productive we become as thinkers" (page 98.) as in Google's view, but "Wolf worries that the style of reading promoted by the Net, a style that puts "efficiency" and "immediacy" above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace. When we read online, she says, we tend to become "mere decoders of information" (page 94.) And, it seems to me that the existence of ultimate search engine such as Google that is as smart as people - or even smarter is making people become even lazier to do research on traditional media, while Alexie believes that there are no limits to what he can learn from books. Instead of being a mere decoder of information like Carr, reading through books has saved his life and shaped him to become he is now, a writer. He still remembers that at school Indian kids were expected to be stupid and fail in the non-Indian world, but once again reading books has saved his life from being one of those fail Indian kids. Hence, he devotes himself to visit the schools and help teaching the other Indian kids. "Many are writing their own poems, short stories, and novels. They have read my books. They have read many other books. They look at me with bright eyes and arrogant wonder. They are trying to save their lives" (page 18.) By doing so, he believes that he would be able to save the other Indian kids' lives. The illustrations above have proved how "the circuits woven by our use of the Net will be different from those woven by our reading of books and other printed works" (page 94.) In Carr's essay, he gives us a few examples of how reading on the Internet is affecting him and his friends' ability to focus on long piece of writing. It seems like "the more they use the Web, the more they have to fight to stay focused on long pieces of writing" (page 93.) Due to the hyperlinks, blinking ads, and other digital gewgaws, people become less focused to the article or the content of the Internet itself. Again, Alexie proudly explains how his passion to read on books, magazines and other printed works has enabled him to become a smarter and better person in the future notwithstanding his childhood story. "Despite all the books I read, I am still surprised I became a writer... In all my years in the reservation school system, I was never taught how to write poetry, short stories, or novels... Writing was something beyond Indians" (page 18.) This illustration gives us an insight that books are better than the Internet and that books should remain an important resource as we grow up. Even though the Internet is more efficient than from books, books are more credible and the excitement we get when we are learning with books are endless. The number of people who read books is lower than we think, in fact, due to the crazy quilt of Internet, traditional media have to adapt to the audience's new expectations. As a consequence, today's traditional media is more like an entertainment instead of becoming one of the relevant sources to learn. Carr explains, "Television programs add text crawls and pop-up ads, and magazines and newspaper shorten their articles, introduce capsule summaries, and crowd their pages with easy-to-browse info-snippets" (page 97.) In other words, people today are more attracted to read the news with gewgaws even though those things may distract a person's ability to concentrate. They can no longer read books because they have lost the excitement to read books unlike Alexie that used to read anything "with equal parts of joy and desperation" (page 18.) to save his life. In conclusion, I think the essays "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" and "The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me" are such a debate between learning from books and the Internet and how learning from those media impact on us. Reading books is believed to provide more knowledge than reading on the Internet because what the Internet seems to be doing is stealing away people's ability to concentrate and altering people's mental habits instead. Our process of thinking depends on the media we use for reading. By the time we reach adulthood, the neural cells in our brain are largely fixed. Hence, learning at an early age (childhood) means better literacy skill, driven by the fact that we learn faster and better when we are at that age.
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Why the Habit of Reading Must Be Cultivated
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Why The Habit Of Reading Must Be Cultivated

Words: 1418    Pages: 5    Paragraphs: 6    Sentences: 79    Read Time: 05:09
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              Working. Reading. Eating. Music. Sports. Entertainment. Everybody has a pleasure in life. There are different kinds of pleasure and everyone can experience different amounts of pleasure at a time. However, reading provides the best kind of pleasure among all since it also gives us knowledge, experience, inspiration, information and mental refreshment. Regardless of the purposes, reading has always been metaphorically considered "a window to the world", meaning that it gives us a broader understanding of the world. There was a doctor named Doctor Seuss who once said, "The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go. " Hence, I believe that the habit of reading needs to be cultivated. Childhood is usually the best period when it should be started because the younger a child is, the more quickly they can learn to read. Unfortunately, today most of the modern students use the Internet more and read books for getting through the tests only. The statistics released by the U. S. Education Department also shows that about 14% of U. S. adults cannot read. It is sad that the crisis of adult literacy is getting worse while in the world of today we really need this skill. A person needs to be literate to a certain level for him to function in the society. In the texts by Sherman Alexie, "The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me" and Nicholas Carr's "Is Google Making Us Stupid? " they state how reading from printed works such as books and magazines and reading from the Internet differ. In Alexie's essay, he tells about how reading books at an early age has enabled him to grow up to be a smart and successful Indian while on the contrary, Carr tells about how reading on the Internet has robbed away his ability to read books and focus on long pieces reading instead.
             
              We may use different types of media to learn to read. However, it is important to know that the media we use in learning may play an important part in shaping our thoughts. In "Is Google Making Us Stupid? " Nicholas Carr repeatedly mentions how the Internet becomes his and many people's medium today to learn and access information. In fact, "the Internet, an immeasurably powerful computing system, is subsuming most of our other intellectual technologies. It's becoming our map and our clock, our printing press and our typewriter, our calculator and our telephone, and our radio and our TV" (page 96. ) Looking at how the Internet we know today has a lot of functions, it is predicted that the Internet will continue to have larger impact on the cognition in the future. "Never has a communications system (the Internet) played so many roles in our lives - or exerted such broad influence over our thoughts - as the Internet does today" (page 97. ) However, while Carr uses the Internet as his learning tool, Sherman Alexie still uses traditional media such as books and anything that has text on it to learn to read. "I can remember picking up my father's books before I could read. The words themselves were mostly foreign, but I still remember the exact moment when I first understood, with a sudden clarity, the purpose of a paragraph" (page 16. ) In the illustration, he tries to explain how he taught himself at an early age before he could even read and advances quickly, which makes him, as an Indian growing up in the reservation, feel proud of himself.
             
              Learning from books and using the Internet carry their own advantages and disadvantages. Even though Carr believes that learning through the Internet provides more immediacy and efficiency than books, however it comes with price. It is true that "the more pieces we can "access" and the faster we can extract their gist, the more productive we become as thinkers" (page 98. ) as in Google's view, but "Wolf worries that the style of reading promoted by the Net, a style that puts "efficiency" and "immediacy" above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace. When we read online, she says, we tend to become "mere decoders of information" (page 94. ) And, it seems to me that the existence of ultimate search engine such as Google that is as smart as people - or even smarter is making people become even lazier to do research on traditional media, while Alexie believes that there are no limits to what he can learn from books. Instead of being a mere decoder of information like Carr, reading through books has saved his life and shaped him to become he is now, a writer. He still remembers that at school Indian kids were expected to be stupid and fail in the non-Indian world, but once again reading books has saved his life from being one of those fail Indian kids. Hence, he devotes himself to visit the schools and help teaching the other Indian kids. "Many are writing their own poems, short stories, and novels. They have read my books. They have read many other books. They look at me with bright eyes and arrogant wonder. They are trying to save their lives" (page 18. ) By doing so, he believes that he would be able to save the other Indian kids' lives.
             
              The illustrations above have proved how "the circuits woven by our use of the Net will be different from those woven by our reading of books and other printed works" (page 94. ) In Carr's essay, he gives us a few examples of how reading on the Internet is affecting him and his friends' ability to focus on long piece of writing. It seems like "the more they use the Web, the more they have to fight to stay focused on long pieces of writing" (page 93. ) Due to the hyperlinks, blinking ads, and other digital gewgaws, people become less focused to the article or the content of the Internet itself. Again, Alexie proudly explains how his passion to read on books, magazines and other printed works has enabled him to become a smarter and better person in the future notwithstanding his childhood story. "Despite all the books I read, I am still surprised I became a writer. . . In all my years in the reservation school system, I was never taught how to write poetry, short stories, or novels. . . Writing was something beyond Indians" (page 18. ) This illustration gives us an insight that books are better than the Internet and that books should remain an important resource as we grow up. Even though the Internet is more efficient than from books, books are more credible and the excitement we get when we are learning with books are endless.
             
              The number of people who read books is lower than we think, in fact, due to the crazy quilt of Internet, traditional media have to adapt to the audience's new expectations. As a consequence, today's traditional media is more like an entertainment instead of becoming one of the relevant sources to learn. Carr explains, "Television programs add text crawls and pop-up ads, and magazines and newspaper shorten their articles, introduce capsule summaries, and crowd their pages with easy-to-browse info-snippets" (page 97. ) In other words, people today are more attracted to read the news with gewgaws even though those things may distract a person's ability to concentrate. They can no longer read books because they have lost the excitement to read books unlike Alexie that used to read anything "with equal parts of joy and desperation" (page 18. ) to save his life.
             
              In conclusion, I think the essays "Is Google Making Us Stupid? " and "The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me" are such a debate between learning from books and the Internet and how learning from those media impact on us. Reading books is believed to provide more knowledge than reading on the Internet because what the Internet seems to be doing is stealing away people's ability to concentrate and altering people's mental habits instead. Our process of thinking depends on the media we use for reading. By the time we reach adulthood, the neural cells in our brain are largely fixed. Hence, learning at an early age (childhood) means better literacy skill, driven by the fact that we learn faster and better when we are at that age.
Reading Essay 
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Works Cited

Alexie, Sherman. "The Joy of Writing and Reading: Superman and Me." 50 Essays: A Portable Anthology. 3rd Edition. Ed. Samuel Cohen. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2011. Print.

Carr, Nicholas "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" 50 Essays: A Portable Anthology. 3rd Edition. Ed. Samuel Cohen. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2011. Print.
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