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A fallacy that many Americans believe is that slavery ended in 1863 with the Emancipation Proclamation. The end of slavery in 1863 is just an illusion. Despite being outlawed in many places, slavery is a problem that still persists around the world today. Modern-day slavery is worse today than it was historically. For example, slaves today are a lot cheaper than they were historically, and thus, slaveholders don't need to take care of the slaves. Kevin Bales, in the 2010 TED Talk "How to combat modern day slavery", address this peculiarity when compares the slave trade today to the historical slave trade. Bales asserts "But there is one thing that is particularly remarkable and novel about slavery today, and that is a complete collapse in the price of human beings -- expensive in the past, dirt cheap now." Kevin Bales TED Talk (Bales, 6:14). The slave owners would spend more taking care of the slaves than they would buying the slaves. Part of the reasons slaves are cheaper and treated more like trash is that there is a larger amount of slaves today than there ever was historically. J.J. Gould, in an The Atlantic online article "Slavery's Global Comeback," claims that "There are now twice as many people enslaved in the world as there were in the 350 years of the transatlantic slave trade." (Gould 2). Although it is true that there are many slaves more slaves today than there were in the 350 years of the transatlantic slave trade, it iss also true that the percentage of people who are slaves in the global population today is lower than ever before. However, just because the slave trade represents the smallest percentage today does not mean that the slave trade hasn't been growing. There are still more slaves today than there were in the world historically. The slave trade is real, and it has been growing. Human-trafficking happens in almost every country around the world. Human-trafficking even happens in the least expect places, such as first world countries. In a CNN Money article by Steve Hargreaves called "I was a modern-day slave in America, Hargreaves describes the experience of Ima Matul, a victim of modern-day slavery in America. "Matul was one of an estimated 20 to 30 million people worldwide currently being held as modern-day slaves. Hundreds of thousands are thought to be in the United States. To many Americans, forced labor is something that's thought to take place in other countries. Human trafficking in the United States is largely assumed to be an issue related to prostitution and sexual abuse. Yet over 20% of the calls received by the National Human Trafficking Resource Center since 2007 have been non-sexual labor related, according to a report released Thursday" (Hargreaves 2). Slavery exists almost everywhere in the world. Greaves provides an estimate of slaves around the world. Greaves claims "The leading demographic accounts of contemporary slavery project a global slave population of between 20 million and 30 million people. The highest ratios of slaves worldwide are from South and Southeast Asia, along with China, Russia, and the former satellite states of the Soviet Union. There is a significant slave presence across North Africa and the Middle East, including Lebanon. There is also a major slave trade in Africa. Descent-based slavery persists in Mauritania, where children of slaves are passed on to their slaveholders' children. And the North Korean gulag system, which holds 200,000 people, is essentially a constellation of slave-labor camps. Most of the world's slaves are in sedentary forms of servitude, such as hereditary collateral-debt bondage, but about 20 percent have been unwittingly trafficked by predators through deception and coercion." (Greaves 2). Human trafficking happens in first, second and third world countries. Slavery, though widespread, is a preventable injustice. In order to eliminate everything, there must be global change, but more importantly, changes must happen on a local level. For example, Lief Coorlim, in the CNN article "Crowd sourcing to fight human trafficking," describes the need for transportation in certain places like Cambodia and India. Anti-trafficking advocates want a van and benches. They need transportation. Children are abducted by traffickers because when they walk in the streets, they risk being abducted by traffickers. (Coorlim 1). Making changes that prevent slavery at many local levels will have an effect on the world sooner or later. It's much harder to stop slavery in one fell swoop. Freedom is not free. A major part of Bale's TEDTalk is about the price of freedom for slaves around the world. He starts off by saying that we don't buy people out of slavery, because it would encourage the crime of human trafficking. He claims that freedom for these slaves is a process, and cannot happen immediately. "It's about helping people to build lives of dignity, stability, economic autonomy, citizenship." Bales claims that in order to liberate all slaves, to keep them liberated, to give them the ability to sustain themselves without any additional aid, the price is around 10.8 billion dollars. He claims that the 10.8 billion dollars is a small amount of money compared to how much money there is around the globe, and that the investment is more than worth it. He claims when people get out of slavery, they will be motivated to build and make things they need but have never had before, such as schools, clothing, and medicine. The local economy grows, and the people are no longer reliant on any other people. Bales relates his idea of sustainable freedom to the Emancipation Proclamation. "That's important, all of that about how we rebuild sustainable freedom, because we'd never want to repeat what happened in this country in 1865. Four million people were lifted up out of slavery and then dumped. Dumped without political participation, decent education, any kind of real opportunity in terms of economic lives, and then sentenced to generations of violence and prejudice and discrimination. And America is still paying the price for the botched emancipation of 1865" (Bales 11:42-14:26). Slavery can be eliminated, but it has to be done right, and it can't be eliminated all at once. It's going to take time to make sure that the people who are slaves become free, and are able to stay free. Slavery is a calamity that plagues many people around the world. Slavery has grown worse over the years, as the price of slaves has declined. Almost every country in the world has human-trafficking happening within it's borders. Slavery can be stopped. Human-trafficking brings shame upon the human race, and it's up humans to abolish slavery, permanently.
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the Elimination of the Issues of Slavery and Human Trafficking
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The Elimination Of The Issues Of Slavery And Human Trafficking

Words: 1094    Pages: 4    Paragraphs: 5    Sentences: 70    Read Time: 03:58
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              A fallacy that many Americans believe is that slavery ended in 1863 with the Emancipation Proclamation. The end of slavery in 1863 is just an illusion. Despite being outlawed in many places, slavery is a problem that still persists around the world today.
             
              Modern-day slavery is worse today than it was historically. For example, slaves today are a lot cheaper than they were historically, and thus, slaveholders don't need to take care of the slaves. Kevin Bales, in the 2010 TED Talk "How to combat modern day slavery", address this peculiarity when compares the slave trade today to the historical slave trade. Bales asserts "But there is one thing that is particularly remarkable and novel about slavery today, and that is a complete collapse in the price of human beings -- expensive in the past, dirt cheap now. " Kevin Bales TED Talk (Bales, 6: 14). The slave owners would spend more taking care of the slaves than they would buying the slaves. Part of the reasons slaves are cheaper and treated more like trash is that there is a larger amount of slaves today than there ever was historically. J. J. Gould, in an The Atlantic online article "Slavery's Global Comeback," claims that "There are now twice as many people enslaved in the world as there were in the 350 years of the transatlantic slave trade. " (Gould 2). Although it is true that there are many slaves more slaves today than there were in the 350 years of the transatlantic slave trade, it iss also true that the percentage of people who are slaves in the global population today is lower than ever before. However, just because the slave trade represents the smallest percentage today does not mean that the slave trade hasn't been growing. There are still more slaves today than there were in the world historically. The slave trade is real, and it has been growing.
             
              Human-trafficking happens in almost every country around the world. Human-trafficking even happens in the least expect places, such as first world countries. In a CNN Money article by Steve Hargreaves called "I was a modern-day slave in America, Hargreaves describes the experience of Ima Matul, a victim of modern-day slavery in America. "Matul was one of an estimated 20 to 30 million people worldwide currently being held as modern-day slaves. Hundreds of thousands are thought to be in the United States. To many Americans, forced labor is something that's thought to take place in other countries. Human trafficking in the United States is largely assumed to be an issue related to prostitution and sexual abuse. Yet over 20% of the calls received by the National Human Trafficking Resource Center since 2007 have been non-sexual labor related, according to a report released Thursday" (Hargreaves 2). Slavery exists almost everywhere in the world. Greaves provides an estimate of slaves around the world. Greaves claims "The leading demographic accounts of contemporary slavery project a global slave population of between 20 million and 30 million people. The highest ratios of slaves worldwide are from South and Southeast Asia, along with China, Russia, and the former satellite states of the Soviet Union. There is a significant slave presence across North Africa and the Middle East, including Lebanon. There is also a major slave trade in Africa. Descent-based slavery persists in Mauritania, where children of slaves are passed on to their slaveholders' children. And the North Korean gulag system, which holds 200,000 people, is essentially a constellation of slave-labor camps. Most of the world's slaves are in sedentary forms of servitude, such as hereditary collateral-debt bondage, but about 20 percent have been unwittingly trafficked by predators through deception and coercion. " (Greaves 2). Human trafficking happens in first, second and third world countries.
             
              Slavery, though widespread, is a preventable injustice. In order to eliminate everything, there must be global change, but more importantly, changes must happen on a local level. For example, Lief Coorlim, in the CNN article "Crowd sourcing to fight human trafficking," describes the need for transportation in certain places like Cambodia and India. Anti-trafficking advocates want a van and benches. They need transportation. Children are abducted by traffickers because when they walk in the streets, they risk being abducted by traffickers. (Coorlim 1). Making changes that prevent slavery at many local levels will have an effect on the world sooner or later. It's much harder to stop slavery in one fell swoop. Freedom is not free. A major part of Bale's TEDTalk is about the price of freedom for slaves around the world. He starts off by saying that we don't buy people out of slavery, because it would encourage the crime of human trafficking. He claims that freedom for these slaves is a process, and cannot happen immediately. "It's about helping people to build lives of dignity, stability, economic autonomy, citizenship. " Bales claims that in order to liberate all slaves, to keep them liberated, to give them the ability to sustain themselves without any additional aid, the price is around 10. 8 billion dollars. He claims that the 10. 8 billion dollars is a small amount of money compared to how much money there is around the globe, and that the investment is more than worth it. He claims when people get out of slavery, they will be motivated to build and make things they need but have never had before, such as schools, clothing, and medicine. The local economy grows, and the people are no longer reliant on any other people. Bales relates his idea of sustainable freedom to the Emancipation Proclamation. "That's important, all of that about how we rebuild sustainable freedom, because we'd never want to repeat what happened in this country in 1865. Four million people were lifted up out of slavery and then dumped. Dumped without political participation, decent education, any kind of real opportunity in terms of economic lives, and then sentenced to generations of violence and prejudice and discrimination. And America is still paying the price for the botched emancipation of 1865" (Bales 11: 42-14: 26). Slavery can be eliminated, but it has to be done right, and it can't be eliminated all at once. It's going to take time to make sure that the people who are slaves become free, and are able to stay free.
             
              Slavery is a calamity that plagues many people around the world. Slavery has grown worse over the years, as the price of slaves has declined. Almost every country in the world has human-trafficking happening within it's borders. Slavery can be stopped. Human-trafficking brings shame upon the human race, and it's up humans to abolish slavery, permanently.
Human Trafficking Essay 
+1
Bales, Kevin. "How to Combat Modern Slavery" Kevin Bales. TED. February 2010. Lecture.

Coorlim, Lief. "Crowd Sourcing to Fight Human Trafficking." The CNN Freedom Project Ending Modern Day Slavery RSS. CNN, 30 Jan. 2015. Web. 03 Feb. 2015.

Gould, J.J. "Slavery's Global Comeback." The Atlantic. Atlantic Media Company, 19 Dec. 2012. Web. 03 Feb. 2015.

Hargreaves, Steve. "I Was a Modern-day Slave in America." CNNMoney. Cable News Network, 25 Nov. 2013. Web. 02 Feb. 2015.

Maddox, Tony. "Modern-day Slavery: A Problem That Can't Be Ignored." The CNN Freedom Project Ending ModernDay Slavery RSS. CNN, 4 Mar. 2011. Web. 03 Feb. 2015.
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