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People have many different views about what traveling means to them and their rationale behind their travels. I set out to discover how these views about traveling and rationale differed between college age adults. I decided to research this topic because I am interested in how those in similar circumstances to mine, such as age and schooling, have differing mindsets when it comes to travel. I wondered what reasons college students have for traveling and what their perceptions of the definition of travel were. Through my research I have found that of those interviewed and surveyed, many share the same values about travel. Many college ages adults perceive travel as a tool used to gain valuable life experiences and as an outlet for adventure, which suggests there might be a correlation between travel and the youth, inexperience, and desire to learn of many college aged adults. The research methods I executed were a mixture of personal interviews and online surveys. Survey questions were constructed with three general demographic questions followed by seven travel related questions with two open ended questions. I emailed the survey to my entire class and even had a few outsiders a bit older than the median age of college students take it in order to diversify a few of the responses. The survey questions revolved around travel; more specifically, they garnered specifically around what one thinks of travel. The few open ended questions I included allowed significantly greater responses to gain personal insight from those being surveyed as opposed to close ended questions being simple, to the point, and lacking much personal flavor. I interviewed two students on my floor who are at the complete opposite ends of student life: one is a freshman and the other is a super-senior. The questions asked in the interviews were very similar to the survey questions in order to be able to easily relate the surveys and interviews to each other and see how they compare to the collective group's opinion. Also, it allowed for very personal answers not achievable in surveys even with open ended questions. I asked each participant eight initial questions with room for two more follow up questions where appropriate. It was interesting to see how the similar questions between the surveys and interviews differed and how they were the same. After emailing my survey to my class and having others take it, I received 43 finished responses. There were slightly more females who responded, but I do not think that means much, if anything. Also, there was not a large minority population take part in my survey so minority groups might be misrepresented in the research I gathered. Just over 85% of responses on the survey think that travel is both domestic and international with neither having any precedence over the other. 83% of those responding to the survey believe there is a difference between travel and tourism. Tyler O'Conner, a 19 year old freshman, thinks tourism is about any self improvement and is only used as a "one-upper" in social situations. Most define travel as a cultural, learning experience and in the literal sense, going from one place to another. One respondent hit the nail on the head by saying, "Travel is a way to experience new, unfamiliar, places and cultures--whether it be adventurous, challenging, fun, miserable, fascinating, inspiring. Travel immerses us in the world at large, and exposes us to parts of ourselves that lay dormant in the day-to-day grind." This definition incorporates almost every angle one could vision travel being, even the miserable parts which are always present. Although 83% believe travel to be an essential part of life, Andrew Blansett, a super-senior political science major, believes travel to be very important, just not essential, in life. I find this response to be favorable over true or false and think most of those who responded would agree. Studying abroad is quite popular among college students so it is a perfect outlet to gain knowledge on how they view travel. One respondent is planning on studying abroad because he "want[s] the adventure of living in a new place, the experience of learning about a new culture and the people there, the independence, and personal development from living on my own and having to figure out a completely new land by myself." These results provide an essential tool in determining how college aged students identify travel. When analyzing the results I was given, I noticed many trends throughout all the answers. Learning was a key trend that came up in many places. Some felt learning was an essential part of travel and others hoped to seek learning through studying abroad for personal reasons as well as academic such as inspiration in art and immersion into a foreign language. Inspiration was also present and ties into the idea of learning. Even if not directly said, this trend was easily discerned from the responses. Learning and inspiration are largely present because of the age of college students. Being young, not sure of where to head in life, and having a desire to learn contribute to this conclusion; they may be looking for guidance through experience because of their inexperience. Cultural experiences were also a huge theme, appearing in almost every location possible. It is pretty safe to say that cultural experiences are a huge factor in why college aged students travel. The last four trends I found are closely related. Escape, independence, and personal development and discovery are all central to one's personal growth. Again relating to the youth and inexperience, college students are eager to "get away" from the everyday norm and "find themselves" in outward travels abroad. The results received correlate with the rationality behind why we travel. The textbook definition of moving from point A to point B is certainly not the only thing travel is. Travel is a collective idea from each person's life and experiences, takes a lifetime to form, and is different for everybody. I received a lot of consistent answers between the surveys and interviews which significantly helped prove my thesis. The surveys provided me with straight to the point answers on travel while the interviews gave me more in depth answers regarding travel. It is interesting to see how the results relate to the age of the group surveyed/interviewed. If I were to extend my research beyond what I have already done, I would include a broader range of ages to compare and contrast. From current research, I cannot dictate how other age groups see this topic. Will other close age groups share similar ideas or will older generations be in agreement? As it stands, I could only compare this small collegiate age group.
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Travel Through the Eyes of College Students
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Travel Through The Eyes Of College Students

Words: 1118    Pages: 4    Paragraphs: 5    Sentences: 54    Read Time: 04:03
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              People have many different views about what traveling means to them and their rationale behind their travels. I set out to discover how these views about traveling and rationale differed between college age adults. I decided to research this topic because I am interested in how those in similar circumstances to mine, such as age and schooling, have differing mindsets when it comes to travel. I wondered what reasons college students have for traveling and what their perceptions of the definition of travel were. Through my research I have found that of those interviewed and surveyed, many share the same values about travel. Many college ages adults perceive travel as a tool used to gain valuable life experiences and as an outlet for adventure, which suggests there might be a correlation between travel and the youth, inexperience, and desire to learn of many college aged adults.
              The research methods I executed were a mixture of personal interviews and online surveys. Survey questions were constructed with three general demographic questions followed by seven travel related questions with two open ended questions. I emailed the survey to my entire class and even had a few outsiders a bit older than the median age of college students take it in order to diversify a few of the responses. The survey questions revolved around travel; more specifically, they garnered specifically around what one thinks of travel. The few open ended questions I included allowed significantly greater responses to gain personal insight from those being surveyed as opposed to close ended questions being simple, to the point, and lacking much personal flavor. I interviewed two students on my floor who are at the complete opposite ends of student life: one is a freshman and the other is a super-senior. The questions asked in the interviews were very similar to the survey questions in order to be able to easily relate the surveys and interviews to each other and see how they compare to the collective group's opinion. Also, it allowed for very personal answers not achievable in surveys even with open ended questions. I asked each participant eight initial questions with room for two more follow up questions where appropriate. It was interesting to see how the similar questions between the surveys and interviews differed and how they were the same.
             
              After emailing my survey to my class and having others take it, I received 43 finished responses. There were slightly more females who responded, but I do not think that means much, if anything. Also, there was not a large minority population take part in my survey so minority groups might be misrepresented in the research I gathered. Just over 85% of responses on the survey think that travel is both domestic and international with neither having any precedence over the other. 83% of those responding to the survey believe there is a difference between travel and tourism. Tyler O'Conner, a 19 year old freshman, thinks tourism is about any self improvement and is only used as a "one-upper" in social situations. Most define travel as a cultural, learning experience and in the literal sense, going from one place to another. One respondent hit the nail on the head by saying, "Travel is a way to experience new, unfamiliar, places and cultures--whether it be adventurous, challenging, fun, miserable, fascinating, inspiring. Travel immerses us in the world at large, and exposes us to parts of ourselves that lay dormant in the day-to-day grind. " This definition incorporates almost every angle one could vision travel being, even the miserable parts which are always present. Although 83% believe travel to be an essential part of life, Andrew Blansett, a super-senior political science major, believes travel to be very important, just not essential, in life. I find this response to be favorable over true or false and think most of those who responded would agree. Studying abroad is quite popular among college students so it is a perfect outlet to gain knowledge on how they view travel. One respondent is planning on studying abroad because he "want[s] the adventure of living in a new place, the experience of learning about a new culture and the people there, the independence, and personal development from living on my own and having to figure out a completely new land by myself. " These results provide an essential tool in determining how college aged students identify travel.
             
              When analyzing the results I was given, I noticed many trends throughout all the answers. Learning was a key trend that came up in many places. Some felt learning was an essential part of travel and others hoped to seek learning through studying abroad for personal reasons as well as academic such as inspiration in art and immersion into a foreign language. Inspiration was also present and ties into the idea of learning. Even if not directly said, this trend was easily discerned from the responses. Learning and inspiration are largely present because of the age of college students. Being young, not sure of where to head in life, and having a desire to learn contribute to this conclusion; they may be looking for guidance through experience because of their inexperience. Cultural experiences were also a huge theme, appearing in almost every location possible. It is pretty safe to say that cultural experiences are a huge factor in why college aged students travel. The last four trends I found are closely related. Escape, independence, and personal development and discovery are all central to one's personal growth. Again relating to the youth and inexperience, college students are eager to "get away" from the everyday norm and "find themselves" in outward travels abroad. The results received correlate with the rationality behind why we travel. The textbook definition of moving from point A to point B is certainly not the only thing travel is. Travel is a collective idea from each person's life and experiences, takes a lifetime to form, and is different for everybody.
             
              I received a lot of consistent answers between the surveys and interviews which significantly helped prove my thesis. The surveys provided me with straight to the point answers on travel while the interviews gave me more in depth answers regarding travel. It is interesting to see how the results relate to the age of the group surveyed/interviewed. If I were to extend my research beyond what I have already done, I would include a broader range of ages to compare and contrast. From current research, I cannot dictate how other age groups see this topic. Will other close age groups share similar ideas or will older generations be in agreement? As it stands, I could only compare this small collegiate age group.
Travel Essay 
Cannon, Ryan. "Travel." Survey. SurveyMonkey. Survey. 8 Feb. 2010.
Blansett, Andrew. "Travel Interview." Personal interview. 17 Feb. 2010.
O'Connor, Tyler. "Travel Interview." Personal interview. 6 Feb. 2010.
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