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President Obama has a lot on his plate coming into his second term and the odds of having a messy second term are not in his favor. Historically second-term Presidents have faced some type of major issue or scandal in their second terms, and only time will tell if the same will occur for President Obama. In Chapter 6 in the Fault Lines text, 3 points are argued by 3 different authors, Adam Clymer, Tim Cavanaugh, and Akhil Reed Amar, who hail from backgrounds and offer their own insight into the second term of President Obama. I will analyze the reality of the second term curse, the memory of failures during second terms, descriptions of various successes and failures of past presidents, and key points throughout the chapter. The curse is essentially a matter of probability, we remember failures more easily, I agree with the descriptions of the successes and failures for the most part, and my stance in the debate leans toward Clymer and Amar. Historically, American presidents have always served a maximum of two terms. Franklin Delano Roosevelt became bold and ran for a third term and won. The 22nd amendment was passed to prevent this from occurring again. Second terms have in the past been wrought with turmoil. This is simply a matter of probability and there are reasonable explanations for the failures and conflicts of second terms. Presidents going into their second terms now are often bolder and attempt to implement bigger ideas than in their first terms because there's no possibility of reelection. In other cases, Presidents simply do not have enough strong ideas or have lost vital members to their cabinets, as is the case with Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the loss of his adviser Louis Howe. In other instances, the president shoots himself in the foot. President Clinton did just that with his involvement in the Monica Lewinsky Scandal and was impeached for it. In actuality, even presidents that do not serve consecutive terms have administrations riddled with problems.The problems that second terms are riddled with overshadow the good that the presidents have done in their terms, and that there are failures in each president's term throughout the history of the United States of America. Historians and critics are quick to account for the failures and misgivings of past presidents. Far too often the great things past presidents have done are glossed over or simply overlooked in favor of their mistakes. Eisenhower greatly faltered after his reelections because of his loss of key cabinet members and lack of new ideas. Eisenhower, however, kept the peace with the Soviet Union in the 50's, a seemingly impossible task at the time. President Regan's second term became plagued with the Iran-Contra Scandal but he also enacted the 1986 tax law, which closed loopholes and lowered tax rates, and forged an arms control agreement with Mikhail Gorbachev, president of the Soviet Union. We must take care to account for both success and failures during our analysis of the second terms of presidents. I agree with the descriptions written in chapter 6, but to a certain extent. The authors could have listed more detail as to what the scandals and problems the presidents faced were. The authors merely state that the presidents had poor second terms. The authors whose writing was exhibited in this chapter did offer some valid points however. Adam Clymer's stance on the second term curse was fair with what I believe to be little to no bias. He lists various failures and issues presidents in their second term have come across, but he doesn't forget to mention that these problems overshadow the good these presidents have done in their second terms. Clymer also gives various insights into why presidents may find trouble in their second terms, such as a lack of new ideas, or a loss of a key cabinet member. Overall, Clymer is unbiased and states that Obama does not have to have issues in his second term, but rather the fate of the President's second term is in his own hands. This view is unlike the next author, Tim Cavanaugh, who is completely skeptical of President Obama's second term. Tim Cavanaugh begins his essay by tearing President Obama's first term apart and criticizing the Obama administration for thoughts of new ideas. Cavanaugh focuses completely on the negatives of Obama's time in office. He addresses President Obama's lack of regard for congressional authorization but only gives one side to the matter as is the case with most of the points he makes. Cavanaugh is convinced President Obama's second term will be disastrous. The final author in the chapter, Akhil Reed Amar, does not feel the same way. Akhil Reed Amar shares a viewpoint that is similar to Adam Clymer's. Amar believes that President Obama's second term does not have to be filled with problems, and the outlook for the future is bright for the president. Amar goes on to detail the various shifting of political tides The United States of America has had in the past. President Obama can keep the political tide from shifting after his presidency. He states that for President Obama to avoid having his administration viewed as a lame duck and keeping the democrats in power, he has a few options. Obama can designate a replacement for the future, much like previous presidents have done. He can also use his youth to stay involved with politics. Amar also believes, unlike Cavanaugh, that Obama needs to go big or go home with his ideas to found a legacy for himself. I agree with Amar, but I also agree with points made by other writers as well. I stand in the middle in this debate. I believe President Obama has made some horrible decisions during his presidency and I do not agree with some of what he does. In my opinion, President Obama can still redeem himself, and make the changes that will uplift this great nation. I am sure that more mistakes will be made during his presidency, but I am optimistic that President Obama can bring about new change for good of everyone. Both sides of this debate bring valid, as well as weak, points to the table. A strength to their essays, Clymer and Amar list many instances of problems for past presidents, but they also go on to state that the negatives often overshadow the good these presidents have done. They make it known that there will be problems in the future for President Obama but that he does not have to be known as a lame duck president in his second term and his fate rests in his own hands. A weakness in their arguments is that Clymer and Amar do not list any real negatives of the Obama administration. They completely ignore his past decisions. On the other side, Cavanaugh merely states that because of President Obama's past failures, there is no chance he will have a successful second term. The strength of Cavanaugh's essay relies on the pertinent facts and reasonable evidence he presents to support his claim. A weakness is that he completely ignores the other side of the argument and shows incredible bias towards one side. He also does not reference any past presidents or the second term curse for that matter. Both sides present valid arguments. If the past is any indication, President Obama is primed to have a poor second term. In Chapter 6 in the Fault Lines text, the probability of a second term riddled with failure is analyzed. It is determined that the second term curse comes down to probability, failures of past presidents are more easily remembered than their successes, and valid descriptions of these presidents successes and failures are listed. These points all tie into the views of the authors. The views of Adam Clymer andAkhil Reed Amar dictate that President Obama can have a successful second term while referencing second terms of past presidents. On the other side of the spectrum, Tim Cavanaugh believes that because of the presidents past mistakes in his first term his second term is already destined to fail. Both present valid points but in the end I believe Obama has made mistakes, but he can still have a successful second term.
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President Barack Obama and the Second Term Curse
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President Barack Obama And The Second Term Curse

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              President Obama has a lot on his plate coming into his second term and the odds of having a messy second term are not in his favor. Historically second-term Presidents have faced some type of major issue or scandal in their second terms, and only time will tell if the same will occur for President Obama. In Chapter 6 in the Fault Lines text, 3 points are argued by 3 different authors, Adam Clymer, Tim Cavanaugh, and Akhil Reed Amar, who hail from backgrounds and offer their own insight into the second term of President Obama. I will analyze the reality of the second term curse, the memory of failures during second terms, descriptions of various successes and failures of past presidents, and key points throughout the chapter. The curse is essentially a matter of probability, we remember failures more easily, I agree with the descriptions of the successes and failures for the most part, and my stance in the debate leans toward Clymer and Amar.
             
              Historically, American presidents have always served a maximum of two terms. Franklin Delano Roosevelt became bold and ran for a third term and won. The 22nd amendment was passed to prevent this from occurring again. Second terms have in the past been wrought with turmoil. This is simply a matter of probability and there are reasonable explanations for the failures and conflicts of second terms. Presidents going into their second terms now are often bolder and attempt to implement bigger ideas than in their first terms because there's no possibility of reelection. In other cases, Presidents simply do not have enough strong ideas or have lost vital members to their cabinets, as is the case with Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the loss of his adviser Louis Howe. In other instances, the president shoots himself in the foot. President Clinton did just that with his involvement in the Monica Lewinsky Scandal and was impeached for it. In actuality, even presidents that do not serve consecutive terms have administrations riddled with problems. The problems that second terms are riddled with overshadow the good that the presidents have done in their terms, and that there are failures in each president's term throughout the history of the United States of America.
             
              Historians and critics are quick to account for the failures and misgivings of past presidents. Far too often the great things past presidents have done are glossed over or simply overlooked in favor of their mistakes. Eisenhower greatly faltered after his reelections because of his loss of key cabinet members and lack of new ideas. Eisenhower, however, kept the peace with the Soviet Union in the 50's, a seemingly impossible task at the time. President Regan's second term became plagued with the Iran-Contra Scandal but he also enacted the 1986 tax law, which closed loopholes and lowered tax rates, and forged an arms control agreement with Mikhail Gorbachev, president of the Soviet Union. We must take care to account for both success and failures during our analysis of the second terms of presidents.
             
              I agree with the descriptions written in chapter 6, but to a certain extent. The authors could have listed more detail as to what the scandals and problems the presidents faced were. The authors merely state that the presidents had poor second terms. The authors whose writing was exhibited in this chapter did offer some valid points however.
             
              Adam Clymer's stance on the second term curse was fair with what I believe to be little to no bias. He lists various failures and issues presidents in their second term have come across, but he doesn't forget to mention that these problems overshadow the good these presidents have done in their second terms. Clymer also gives various insights into why presidents may find trouble in their second terms, such as a lack of new ideas, or a loss of a key cabinet member. Overall, Clymer is unbiased and states that Obama does not have to have issues in his second term, but rather the fate of the President's second term is in his own hands. This view is unlike the next author, Tim Cavanaugh, who is completely skeptical of President Obama's second term.
             
              Tim Cavanaugh begins his essay by tearing President Obama's first term apart and criticizing the Obama administration for thoughts of new ideas. Cavanaugh focuses completely on the negatives of Obama's time in office. He addresses President Obama's lack of regard for congressional authorization but only gives one side to the matter as is the case with most of the points he makes. Cavanaugh is convinced President Obama's second term will be disastrous. The final author in the chapter, Akhil Reed Amar, does not feel the same way.
             
              Akhil Reed Amar shares a viewpoint that is similar to Adam Clymer's. Amar believes that President Obama's second term does not have to be filled with problems, and the outlook for the future is bright for the president. Amar goes on to detail the various shifting of political tides The United States of America has had in the past. President Obama can keep the political tide from shifting after his presidency. He states that for President Obama to avoid having his administration viewed as a lame duck and keeping the democrats in power, he has a few options. Obama can designate a replacement for the future, much like previous presidents have done. He can also use his youth to stay involved with politics. Amar also believes, unlike Cavanaugh, that Obama needs to go big or go home with his ideas to found a legacy for himself. I agree with Amar, but I also agree with points made by other writers as well.
             
              I stand in the middle in this debate. I believe President Obama has made some horrible decisions during his presidency and I do not agree with some of what he does. In my opinion, President Obama can still redeem himself, and make the changes that will uplift this great nation. I am sure that more mistakes will be made during his presidency, but I am optimistic that President Obama can bring about new change for good of everyone.
             
              Both sides of this debate bring valid, as well as weak, points to the table. A strength to their essays, Clymer and Amar list many instances of problems for past presidents, but they also go on to state that the negatives often overshadow the good these presidents have done. They make it known that there will be problems in the future for President Obama but that he does not have to be known as a lame duck president in his second term and his fate rests in his own hands. A weakness in their arguments is that Clymer and Amar do not list any real negatives of the Obama administration. They completely ignore his past decisions. On the other side, Cavanaugh merely states that because of President Obama's past failures, there is no chance he will have a successful second term.
             
              The strength of Cavanaugh's essay relies on the pertinent facts and reasonable evidence he presents to support his claim. A weakness is that he completely ignores the other side of the argument and shows incredible bias towards one side. He also does not reference any past presidents or the second term curse for that matter. Both sides present valid arguments.
             
              If the past is any indication, President Obama is primed to have a poor second term. In Chapter 6 in the Fault Lines text, the probability of a second term riddled with failure is analyzed. It is determined that the second term curse comes down to probability, failures of past presidents are more easily remembered than their successes, and valid descriptions of these presidents successes and failures are listed. These points all tie into the views of the authors. The views of Adam Clymer andAkhil Reed Amar dictate that President Obama can have a successful second term while referencing second terms of past presidents. On the other side of the spectrum, Tim Cavanaugh believes that because of the presidents past mistakes in his first term his second term is already destined to fail. Both present valid points but in the end I believe Obama has made mistakes, but he can still have a successful second term.
             
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