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The word democracy is derived from the Greek words of "demos", referring to people and "Kratos", meaning power . The Greeks are credited with developing the earliest forms of democracy around 2,500 years ago. India, Russia, Japan and many other nations have only recently become democratic. Therefore, despite its lengthy history as a concept, democracy has only really become a global reality during the latter half of the 20th century. Democracy means many things to many different people. Winston Churchill has the belief that "...democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time." Democracy is certainly a form of government, whereby the people rule through their elected representatives. The people are absolute, and are the supreme form of political authority. Democracy is also a guardian of the rights of all citizens and the state may not take away, nor interfere with certain basic rights. Finally democracy is the rule of law, under which all citizens are equal. The law maintains order, protects citizens and limits the power of the government. In brief, democracy is the of liberty. For this rationale, any social order must possess the time-tested fundamentals of constitutional government, human rights, and equality before the law to be properly called democratic. Democracy is a unique form of government by nature. There are numerous forms of government in which one person or just a select few obtain and hold political power in a nation. An autocracy is ruled by one person, royal families rule monarchies, dictatorships have but one person with authority and so on, so forth. The clear pattern here is that they are all governed by the few and are not chosen by the general population. True democracy is the only form of government in which every person has a say in the running of his or her country. It matters not what your ethnicity is, which religion you adhere to, your race, or gender, or even age. There is of course a voting age in Canada. However it is part of the beauty of democracy that, even those not of age are welcome to write to their local Member of Parliament or to have their voices heard by other means. Government must not be overly restrictive, as it is only the free man and woman who may unlock their full, unbridled potential. To that effect, we the people have the freedom to decide who shall govern on our behalf, to convey our voices and our wishes, both as a whole and as individuals. Rights are a core component to any democracy. They guarantee all citizens a set of standards and values to call their own. A prime example of the embodiment of right is, The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms . 'The Charter' as it is also known as, ensures certain political rights to Canadian citizens and civil rights of everyone in Canada from the procedures and policies of every level of government. By far the most famous rights initiative ever formed was the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights stipulates 30 articles that cover every aspect of human rights and freedoms. Freedom of speech is a prominent right for the basic reason that without it, we would be unable to voice or fight for any other right. It is however a relative right, meaning it may be taken away by the state in extreme circumstances such as the War Measures Act. Despite the many rights enjoyed by democratic nations such as Canada, there is in existence emergency legislation that may temporarily limit or even rescind particular rights. The War Measures Act (1914-1971) in Canada gave parliament the ability to suspend several rights and freedoms in the case of a threat to the nation's very existence. No matter the reasons for enacting such an action, it is inherently wrong to revoke a right of any kind. Rights must be upheld in order to sustain the society, upon which they are founded. The rule of law is the champion of justice and equality in our society. In an ideal democracy, it is the law that rules the land and it is the law that is the highest authority in a country. No person whether they be a man, woman, King nor Queen is above the law. This is the basis of the rule of law in a democratic society. We elect our officials to positions of office to represent our respective political stances. The key term, which must be noted, is that of the power of position, not of the person. The Prime Minister heads the government of Canada, but once that title has been removed, the person behind the title no longer has any political power, save for perhaps the power of influence. Sadly even nations, who supposedly fight for democracy, are guilty of violating some of their own laws. The United States has condoned the use of torture and other inhumane methods to extract information out of captured Taliban insurgents. The recently re-elected President of Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has called his county's latest election, the world's freest. Yet, hundreds of protesters were detained for simply demonstrating their views and dozens were killed. Law is paramount in democracy and to that effect, the government must follow the law to the letter. Otherwise, the state is in danger of gaining too much power and becoming corrupt. Let us not forget that democracy was founded in Greece by an enlightened group of individuals. Whose ideals of freedom, law, rights and citizenship, all combined to create the most progressive type of government the world has yet seen. Democracy had humble beginnings and in fact did not gain its status as a global tour-de-force until the 20th century. Democracy, as a form of government has proven its resilience through its defeat of fascism during World War Two. Communism was also dealt a severe blow once the U.S.S.R. dissolved into over a dozen fledgling democracies. The people whether they realize it or not, hold the power, regardless of the system of governance. On that note, democracy is the fairest method in which the people may have a direct say in the way they are governed. Establishment of the rights of the populace is an important part of democracy. Rights and freedoms provide for a greater harmony within society, by ensuring no person is discriminated against. No society can operate successfully without laws and democracy is no different. The law is the great equalizer of free democratic society, entitling all citizens to parity. Therefore true democracy is the embodiment of: a higher form of government, a sanctuary of rights and the law of the land.
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Democracy: A Unique Form of People Power
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Democracy: A Unique Form Of People Power

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              The word democracy is derived from the Greek words of "demos", referring to people and "Kratos", meaning power . The Greeks are credited with developing the earliest forms of democracy around 2,500 years ago. India, Russia, Japan and many other nations have only recently become democratic. Therefore, despite its lengthy history as a concept, democracy has only really become a global reality during the latter half of the 20th century. Democracy means many things to many different people. Winston Churchill has the belief that ". . . democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time. " Democracy is certainly a form of government, whereby the people rule through their elected representatives. The people are absolute, and are the supreme form of political authority. Democracy is also a guardian of the rights of all citizens and the state may not take away, nor interfere with certain basic rights. Finally democracy is the rule of law, under which all citizens are equal. The law maintains order, protects citizens and limits the power of the government. In brief, democracy is the of liberty. For this rationale, any social order must possess the time-tested fundamentals of constitutional government, human rights, and equality before the law to be properly called democratic.
             
              Democracy is a unique form of government by nature. There are numerous forms of government in which one person or just a select few obtain and hold political power in a nation. An autocracy is ruled by one person, royal families rule monarchies, dictatorships have but one person with authority and so on, so forth. The clear pattern here is that they are all governed by the few and are not chosen by the general population. True democracy is the only form of government in which every person has a say in the running of his or her country. It matters not what your ethnicity is, which religion you adhere to, your race, or gender, or even age. There is of course a voting age in Canada. However it is part of the beauty of democracy that, even those not of age are welcome to write to their local Member of Parliament or to have their voices heard by other means. Government must not be overly restrictive, as it is only the free man and woman who may unlock their full, unbridled potential. To that effect, we the people have the freedom to decide who shall govern on our behalf, to convey our voices and our wishes, both as a whole and as individuals.
             
              Rights are a core component to any democracy. They guarantee all citizens a set of standards and values to call their own. A prime example of the embodiment of right is, The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms . 'The Charter' as it is also known as, ensures certain political rights to Canadian citizens and civil rights of everyone in Canada from the procedures and policies of every level of government. By far the most famous rights initiative ever formed was the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights stipulates 30 articles that cover every aspect of human rights and freedoms. Freedom of speech is a prominent right for the basic reason that without it, we would be unable to voice or fight for any other right. It is however a relative right, meaning it may be taken away by the state in extreme circumstances such as the War Measures Act. Despite the many rights enjoyed by democratic nations such as Canada, there is in existence emergency legislation that may temporarily limit or even rescind particular rights. The War Measures Act (1914-1971) in Canada gave parliament the ability to suspend several rights and freedoms in the case of a threat to the nation's very existence. No matter the reasons for enacting such an action, it is inherently wrong to revoke a right of any kind. Rights must be upheld in order to sustain the society, upon which they are founded.
             
              The rule of law is the champion of justice and equality in our society. In an ideal democracy, it is the law that rules the land and it is the law that is the highest authority in a country. No person whether they be a man, woman, King nor Queen is above the law. This is the basis of the rule of law in a democratic society. We elect our officials to positions of office to represent our respective political stances. The key term, which must be noted, is that of the power of position, not of the person. The Prime Minister heads the government of Canada, but once that title has been removed, the person behind the title no longer has any political power, save for perhaps the power of influence. Sadly even nations, who supposedly fight for democracy, are guilty of violating some of their own laws. The United States has condoned the use of torture and other inhumane methods to extract information out of captured Taliban insurgents. The recently re-elected President of Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has called his county's latest election, the world's freest. Yet, hundreds of protesters were detained for simply demonstrating their views and dozens were killed. Law is paramount in democracy and to that effect, the government must follow the law to the letter. Otherwise, the state is in danger of gaining too much power and becoming corrupt.
             
              Let us not forget that democracy was founded in Greece by an enlightened group of individuals. Whose ideals of freedom, law, rights and citizenship, all combined to create the most progressive type of government the world has yet seen. Democracy had humble beginnings and in fact did not gain its status as a global tour-de-force until the 20th century. Democracy, as a form of government has proven its resilience through its defeat of fascism during World War Two. Communism was also dealt a severe blow once the U. S. S. R. dissolved into over a dozen fledgling democracies. The people whether they realize it or not, hold the power, regardless of the system of governance. On that note, democracy is the fairest method in which the people may have a direct say in the way they are governed. Establishment of the rights of the populace is an important part of democracy. Rights and freedoms provide for a greater harmony within society, by ensuring no person is discriminated against. No society can operate successfully without laws and democracy is no different. The law is the great equalizer of free democratic society, entitling all citizens to parity. Therefore true democracy is the embodiment of: a higher form of government, a sanctuary of rights and the law of the land.
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