Essay Topics
Types of Essays
Essay Checklist
Word Counter
Readability Score
Essay Rewriter
Some say that the tornado of 1985 will forever go down in history as one of the worst natural disasters that have ever occurred in Pennsylvania (Forbes). In reportedly a matter of a few seconds for some towns, the tornado, stubbornly set on its path of destruction, swept through many towns. Despite how long the tornado may had taken to virtually obliterate them, the result was always the same, maximum damage and death (Haas). The ramifications of the tornado caused severe property damage and casualties, which amplified the dire need for aid and forced those who had lost their homes to quickly realize that actions needed to be taken. Throughout Northwestern Pennsylvania, a reported 21 tornadoes swept through three towns (Haas). Consequently, the tornadoes that rampaged through had caused a grave amount of damage to everyone who was unfortunate enough to be in their paths. Most who speak of these tornadoes often categorize them all into three words, "the Albion tornado," because Albion was, not only the largest of the three towns hit in Northwestern Pennsylvania, but also the town that had needed the most aid as a result of the damage from these tornadoes. The tornado that had pulverized Albion was in fact, ranked as an F-4 on the Fujita scale (Hahn). To clarify, F-4 tornadoes can have winds ranging from 210 to 260 miles per hour and can without a doubt, have winds so powerful that objects such as cars and tractor trailers could be airborne for distances of 300 feet or less! "It was like a war zone," Tara Miller said to describe the aftermath of the dubbed, "Albion tornado." "There was not one spot that didn't have damage and rubble spewed about it, from the main streets to the back roads," Tara she added, over 100 homes were smashed. Not only had this merciless tornado left over 100 families homeless, but it injured over 200 and killed a reported 12 people. "It doesn't matter where you take shelter," Tara said, because a tornado can undoubtedly demolish any house in the same way it did those houses in Albion. Which as a result, completely cleared them away, leaving only the basement. You can never be sure you're safe when there's a tornado. Hundreds of trees had fallen on top of homes, cars, and barns. "It was like dirt and timber, like an attic had just opened up," Tara's husband Jack mentioned, which regarded the,"pungent," smell of the aftermath. In fact, it was reported that toppled trees were responsible for most of the damage in Albion. After Albion, the quiet, self-made, town of Atlantic was struck by a twister of it's own. That twister had shown no magnanimity on the families of this independent Amish community and as a result, destroyed an exact total of 936 homes, caused major damage to 275 homes, and minor damage to 917 homes. It is said that the stark realities of the damage done in Atlantic were surely realized when a photograph of a road in Atlantic was taken. This photograph of the road showed it lined with 11 trailers and the only thing remaining of those homes was scattered debris and block pads. The photograph was reprinted in newspapers all across the county. "...It was child's play," was one way an informative novel worded the destruction of this twister. "About a week later I was mowing my lawn and found sand blasted photos, you couldn't even recognize the faces," Tara Miller reflected. Atlantic had lost a total of 69 community members. Fortunately, for those in Linesville, only two lives were taken. Pymatuning Lake, in Linesville, a group of about 25 people stood and marveled at the tornado as it spun furiously toward them. The tornado was gathering water from the lake, thus transforming itself into an immense white mass. Ten campers, 27 mobile homes, and 15 structures, such as houses and barns, were completely desolated. Wildlife, who usually sought refuge from any type of danger in the wooded areas of Pymatuning, were killed by the hundreds in this storm. The Pennsylvania Game Commission, who had collected dead geese to properly dispose of them, had reported finding the geese with, "their eyes pulled out," which had without a doubt, shown the immense force of the, "vacuum like," wind strength of the tornado (Haas). In the town of Wheatland, a tornado with estimated winds of 300 miles per hour, was rated as an F5 tornado on the Fujita weather measuring scale (Forbes). In this horrendous storm, Wheatland had suffered a monumental blunder to their town, which resulted in it losing 95 percent of their industry. Not only had they lost a valuable aspect of their community, but more than 40 homes were lost and six people had perished (Haas). On account of the mass destruction these tornadoes had caused, the need for aid was tremendously high. The undeserving havoc bedeviled upon the towns hit, was finally put to an end, allowing the community members to disenthrall their minds from the disaster that lay before them. President Ronald Reagan had authorized federal aid to the storm ravaged communities in Western Pennsylvania. The mandate given to Pennsylvanians amounted up to 125 million dollars. The federal and state aid is designated to assist in the restoration of damaged property. Along with the federal aid, the Federal Emergency Management Agency set up 12 disaster relief centers in Western Pennsylvania. There were a few services available that informed the victims of the storm about opportunistic applications for state and federal relief programs, so that the victims could be confident in, "getting back on their feet." The most common type of aid given was a Small Business Administration loan, or SBA. The SBA loans carry a ceiling of 100,000 dollars for homeowners with 20,000 dollars on contents. Those who were ineligible for SBA loans were able to get grants up to 5,000 dollars, so that way aid was given to many people. Some grants available for the purpose of rental assistance or to make imperative repairs to damaged homes. Temporary housing was also available and funded by the government. In addition, house trailers were brought in where the storm victims could live in for up to a year. As previously stated, the town that needed the most federal and state aid was Albion and for that reason, the State House moved as quickly as possible to provide emergency funds for Albion victims. Jim Merry, State Representative said the house voted to consider, "appropriate emergency funding to enable the affected people of this Commonwealth to resume their normal lives." Jim Merry gave a starting amount of what he and other house representatives felt was best for the Commonwealth of Albion, stating that the starting amount figure was, "35 million dollars for the state's 25 percent match for federal disaster relief funds." He also added that, "the final state allocation from the General Fund could range anywhere from 20 million dollars to 50 million dollars (Haas)." The fund from the government was not the only deed undertaking effect in Albion with means to help it thrive once again. Firemen, policemen, and so many others had volunteered to try and help Albion residents. At Northwestern Junior High School in Albion, Red Cross headquarters were set up. Right along side Red Cross was the Salvation Army and the American Legion Auxiliary, all distributing clothing, food, and medical assistants to those who needed it. Also, legal services were available. Even State Offices were set up in the Northwestern High School, for the purpose of assisting those seeking to settle an insurance claim. In certain areas, all within Albion, more volunteer stations were set up, all offering relatively the same thing, food and clothing. "Most of the firefighters that were called, who was everyone they could get, had no experience whatsoever," "the volunteers had no training" either, Tara said in dismay. In Atlantic, the set up of volunteer offices were just as numerous there as they were in Albion. In fact, the groups and companies who offered assistance were too numerous to name. Crawford county, Mercer county, and the lower Erie counties all sent squads and volunteers into Atlantic, almost instantaneously, upon hearing the Atlantic's need for it (Albion). The National Guard was sent in for reinforcement and had taken precautions for any looters who may have been skulking about. All of this aid was necessary in Atlantic because the total damage figure was a substantial amount, totaling to 264,000,000 dollars (Haas)! With all of that damage done, it is easy to assume that these counties may have become discouraged, but actually, the exact opposite had occurred. With all of the succor given, these towns knew that they could become a community again, but recovery for these towns required more than just repairing homes, but also repairing broken hearts. The devastation of these counties was anything but trivial. The Albion clean-up required various degrees of assistance in order to rebuild their region. For example, hundreds of telephone lines had been snapped in half and whipped around, resulting in the difficulty to contact family and friends. "Suddenly, the lines went dead," Tara Miller said, regarding the incident of her and her friend having a discussion about the tornado as it passed over their houses and for that reason, Penelec was on call at all times to fix the technological damage that had been done. Red cross, being the coordinator of all relief given to Albion, had a lot of work to undertow and knew that was imperative aid was distributed rapidly among those whose homes sustained severe damage. All citizens of Albion went right to work on repairing one another's roof, with side by side assistance from volunteers. All over the tri-state area, companies and agencies helped Albion with home repairs. In Atlantic, the cleanup was relatively the same as Albion's. All relief efforts were sought through the Atlantic Congregational Church. "Always have someone know where you are," Tara gave as advice, because the search for neighbors and loved ones became a common activity the following day of the tornado. Volunteer fire companies went into action by putting out electrical fires and helping rescue victims who may have been trapped under fallen debris. In Linesville, no time was wasted early Saturday morning when the cleanup began. Crews, volunteers, and residents worked quickly, picking up mammoth trees that, as a result of the tornado, had tumbled over like they had weighed little to nothing. With winds up to 300 miles per hour, Wheatland had plenty to repair and pick up. For the citizens of Wheatland they knew, "rebuilding would last a long time," for them. Trees thrown through houses, houses thrown through the trees, and nothing left standing. Despite the extensive damage done to all of these towns, cleanup was expeditious, and with successful cleanup comes significant, and rapid recovery (Albion). Those who had lived through, "Pennsylvania's Deadliest Day," know first hand how extensive damage can be done by a tornado of any rating (Forbes). They have experienced hardships and loss, and as a result they became stronger as a whole and as a community, but they didn't overcome those hardships by working alone. With the help from people who are willing to risk their lives in order to help a stranger, the victims of those tornadoes rebuilt their communities. Their towns wrecked by the tornado, but had once bloomed with life, now can become prosperous once again. Nevertheless, those those who endured the devastation of the tornado will surely never forget what happened, even Tara Miller, who had only seen a tornado over her house, said, "I can't sleep if it's too windy," definitely illustrating the effect a storm can have on someone. On account of that, one can fully understand how many people were traumatized after that event. With many natural disasters comes many learned lessons of strength, both physically and mentally, but in order to learn a lesson one must first experience. Discouragement can never become a part of someone because prosperity is always in store for those who truly want it.
Essay Writing Checklist
The following guidelines are designed to give students a checklist to use, whether they are revising individually or as part of a peer review team.
Introduction
  • Is the main idea (i.e., the writer's opinion of the story title) stated clearly?
  • Is the introductory paragraph interesting? Does it make the reader want to keep on reading?
Body Paragraph
  • Does each body paragraph have a clear topic sentence that is related to the main idea of the essay?
  • Does each body paragraph include specific information from the text(including quoted evidence from the text, if required by the instructor)that supports the topic sentence?
  • Is there a clear plan for the order of the body paragraphs (i.e., order of importance, chronology in the story, etc.)?
  • Does each body paragraph transition smoothly to the next?
Conclusion
  • Is the main idea of the essay restated in different words?
  • Are the supporting ideas summarized succinctly and clearly?
  • Is the concluding paragraph interesting? Does it leave an impression on the reader?
Overall Essay
  • Is any important material left unsaid?
  • Is any material repetitious and unnecessary?
  • Has the writer tried to incorporate "voice" in the essay so that it has his/her distinctive mark?
  • Are there changes needed in word choice, sentence length and structure, etc.?
  • Are the quotations (if required) properly cited?
  • Has the essay been proofread for spelling, punctuation, grammar, etc.?
  • Does the essay have an interesting and appropriate title?
The Tornado That Hit Pennsylvania in 1985
Trending Essay Topics
Reference
Feel free to use content on this page for your website, blog or paper we only ask that you reference content back to us. Use the following code to link this page:
Terms · Privacy · Contact
Essay Topics © 2020

The Tornado That Hit Pennsylvania In 1985

Words: 2004    Pages: 7    Paragraphs: 5    Sentences: 96    Read Time: 07:17
Highlight Text to add correction. Use an editor to spell check essay.
              Some say that the tornado of 1985 will forever go down in history as one of the worst natural disasters that have ever occurred in Pennsylvania (Forbes). In reportedly a matter of a few seconds for some towns, the tornado, stubbornly set on its path of destruction, swept through many towns. Despite how long the tornado may had taken to virtually obliterate them, the result was always the same, maximum damage and death (Haas). The ramifications of the tornado caused severe property damage and casualties, which amplified the dire need for aid and forced those who had lost their homes to quickly realize that actions needed to be taken.
             
              Throughout Northwestern Pennsylvania, a reported 21 tornadoes swept through three towns (Haas). Consequently, the tornadoes that rampaged through had caused a grave amount of damage to everyone who was unfortunate enough to be in their paths. Most who speak of these tornadoes often categorize them all into three words, "the Albion tornado," because Albion was, not only the largest of the three towns hit in Northwestern Pennsylvania, but also the town that had needed the most aid as a result of the damage from these tornadoes. The tornado that had pulverized Albion was in fact, ranked as an F-4 on the Fujita scale (Hahn). To clarify, F-4 tornadoes can have winds ranging from 210 to 260 miles per hour and can without a doubt, have winds so powerful that objects such as cars and tractor trailers could be airborne for distances of 300 feet or less! "It was like a war zone," Tara Miller said to describe the aftermath of the dubbed, "Albion tornado. " "There was not one spot that didn't have damage and rubble spewed about it, from the main streets to the back roads," Tara she added, over 100 homes were smashed. Not only had this merciless tornado left over 100 families homeless, but it injured over 200 and killed a reported 12 people. "It doesn't matter where you take shelter," Tara said, because a tornado can undoubtedly demolish any house in the same way it did those houses in Albion. Which as a result, completely cleared them away, leaving only the basement. You can never be sure you're safe when there's a tornado. Hundreds of trees had fallen on top of homes, cars, and barns. "It was like dirt and timber, like an attic had just opened up," Tara's husband Jack mentioned, which regarded the,"pungent," smell of the aftermath. In fact, it was reported that toppled trees were responsible for most of the damage in Albion. After Albion, the quiet, self-made, town of Atlantic was struck by a twister of it's own. That twister had shown no magnanimity on the families of this independent Amish community and as a result, destroyed an exact total of 936 homes, caused major damage to 275 homes, and minor damage to 917 homes. It is said that the stark realities of the damage done in Atlantic were surely realized when a photograph of a road in Atlantic was taken. This photograph of the road showed it lined with 11 trailers and the only thing remaining of those homes was scattered debris and block pads. The photograph was reprinted in newspapers all across the county. ". . . It was child's play," was one way an informative novel worded the destruction of this twister. "About a week later I was mowing my lawn and found sand blasted photos, you couldn't even recognize the faces," Tara Miller reflected. Atlantic had lost a total of 69 community members. Fortunately, for those in Linesville, only two lives were taken. Pymatuning Lake, in Linesville, a group of about 25 people stood and marveled at the tornado as it spun furiously toward them. The tornado was gathering water from the lake, thus transforming itself into an immense white mass. Ten campers, 27 mobile homes, and 15 structures, such as houses and barns, were completely desolated. Wildlife, who usually sought refuge from any type of danger in the wooded areas of Pymatuning, were killed by the hundreds in this storm. The Pennsylvania Game Commission, who had collected dead geese to properly dispose of them, had reported finding the geese with, "their eyes pulled out," which had without a doubt, shown the immense force of the, "vacuum like," wind strength of the tornado (Haas). In the town of Wheatland, a tornado with estimated winds of 300 miles per hour, was rated as an F5 tornado on the Fujita weather measuring scale (Forbes). In this horrendous storm, Wheatland had suffered a monumental blunder to their town, which resulted in it losing 95 percent of their industry. Not only had they lost a valuable aspect of their community, but more than 40 homes were lost and six people had perished (Haas). On account of the mass destruction these tornadoes had caused, the need for aid was tremendously high.
             
              The undeserving havoc bedeviled upon the towns hit, was finally put to an end, allowing the community members to disenthrall their minds from the disaster that lay before them. President Ronald Reagan had authorized federal aid to the storm ravaged communities in Western Pennsylvania. The mandate given to Pennsylvanians amounted up to 125 million dollars. The federal and state aid is designated to assist in the restoration of damaged property. Along with the federal aid, the Federal Emergency Management Agency set up 12 disaster relief centers in Western Pennsylvania. There were a few services available that informed the victims of the storm about opportunistic applications for state and federal relief programs, so that the victims could be confident in, "getting back on their feet. " The most common type of aid given was a Small Business Administration loan, or SBA. The SBA loans carry a ceiling of 100,000 dollars for homeowners with 20,000 dollars on contents. Those who were ineligible for SBA loans were able to get grants up to 5,000 dollars, so that way aid was given to many people. Some grants available for the purpose of rental assistance or to make imperative repairs to damaged homes. Temporary housing was also available and funded by the government. In addition, house trailers were brought in where the storm victims could live in for up to a year. As previously stated, the town that needed the most federal and state aid was Albion and for that reason, the State House moved as quickly as possible to provide emergency funds for Albion victims. Jim Merry, State Representative said the house voted to consider, "appropriate emergency funding to enable the affected people of this Commonwealth to resume their normal lives. " Jim Merry gave a starting amount of what he and other house representatives felt was best for the Commonwealth of Albion, stating that the starting amount figure was, "35 million dollars for the state's 25 percent match for federal disaster relief funds. " He also added that, "the final state allocation from the General Fund could range anywhere from 20 million dollars to 50 million dollars (Haas). " The fund from the government was not the only deed undertaking effect in Albion with means to help it thrive once again. Firemen, policemen, and so many others had volunteered to try and help Albion residents. At Northwestern Junior High School in Albion, Red Cross headquarters were set up. Right along side Red Cross was the Salvation Army and the American Legion Auxiliary, all distributing clothing, food, and medical assistants to those who needed it. Also, legal services were available. Even State Offices were set up in the Northwestern High School, for the purpose of assisting those seeking to settle an insurance claim. In certain areas, all within Albion, more volunteer stations were set up, all offering relatively the same thing, food and clothing. "Most of the firefighters that were called, who was everyone they could get, had no experience whatsoever," "the volunteers had no training" either, Tara said in dismay. In Atlantic, the set up of volunteer offices were just as numerous there as they were in Albion. In fact, the groups and companies who offered assistance were too numerous to name. Crawford county, Mercer county, and the lower Erie counties all sent squads and volunteers into Atlantic, almost instantaneously, upon hearing the Atlantic's need for it (Albion). The National Guard was sent in for reinforcement and had taken precautions for any looters who may have been skulking about. All of this aid was necessary in Atlantic because the total damage figure was a substantial amount, totaling to 264,000,000 dollars (Haas)! With all of that damage done, it is easy to assume that these counties may have become discouraged, but actually, the exact opposite had occurred.
             
              With all of the succor given, these towns knew that they could become a community again, but recovery for these towns required more than just repairing homes, but also repairing broken hearts. The devastation of these counties was anything but trivial. The Albion clean-up required various degrees of assistance in order to rebuild their region. For example, hundreds of telephone lines had been snapped in half and whipped around, resulting in the difficulty to contact family and friends. "Suddenly, the lines went dead," Tara Miller said, regarding the incident of her and her friend having a discussion about the tornado as it passed over their houses and for that reason, Penelec was on call at all times to fix the technological damage that had been done. Red cross, being the coordinator of all relief given to Albion, had a lot of work to undertow and knew that was imperative aid was distributed rapidly among those whose homes sustained severe damage. All citizens of Albion went right to work on repairing one another's roof, with side by side assistance from volunteers. All over the tri-state area, companies and agencies helped Albion with home repairs. In Atlantic, the cleanup was relatively the same as Albion's. All relief efforts were sought through the Atlantic Congregational Church. "Always have someone know where you are," Tara gave as advice, because the search for neighbors and loved ones became a common activity the following day of the tornado. Volunteer fire companies went into action by putting out electrical fires and helping rescue victims who may have been trapped under fallen debris. In Linesville, no time was wasted early Saturday morning when the cleanup began. Crews, volunteers, and residents worked quickly, picking up mammoth trees that, as a result of the tornado, had tumbled over like they had weighed little to nothing. With winds up to 300 miles per hour, Wheatland had plenty to repair and pick up. For the citizens of Wheatland they knew, "rebuilding would last a long time," for them. Trees thrown through houses, houses thrown through the trees, and nothing left standing. Despite the extensive damage done to all of these towns, cleanup was expeditious, and with successful cleanup comes significant, and rapid recovery (Albion).
             
              Those who had lived through, "Pennsylvania's Deadliest Day," know first hand how extensive damage can be done by a tornado of any rating (Forbes). They have experienced hardships and loss, and as a result they became stronger as a whole and as a community, but they didn't overcome those hardships by working alone. With the help from people who are willing to risk their lives in order to help a stranger, the victims of those tornadoes rebuilt their communities. Their towns wrecked by the tornado, but had once bloomed with life, now can become prosperous once again. Nevertheless, those those who endured the devastation of the tornado will surely never forget what happened, even Tara Miller, who had only seen a tornado over her house, said, "I can't sleep if it's too windy," definitely illustrating the effect a storm can have on someone. On account of that, one can fully understand how many people were traumatized after that event. With many natural disasters comes many learned lessons of strength, both physically and mentally, but in order to learn a lesson one must first experience. Discouragement can never become a part of someone because prosperity is always in store for those who truly want it.
Tornado Essay 
Albion Area Disaster News Sheet. Albion: Grace United Methodist Church, E.Pearl and Franklin Streets, 1985. Print

Forbes, Greg Dr. "May 31 - Pennsylvania's Deadliest Day." Weather.com. 31 May 2010. Web.
23 April 2014.
http://www.weather.com/blog/weather/8_22011.html

Haas, H Jesse. Killer Tornadoes May 31, 1985. Conneautville: Haas, O Herbert, 1985. Print.

Hahn,Tim. "Community spirit remembered on anniversary of Albion Tornado." Goerie.com. Erie
Times News, 2010. Web. 27, April 2014.
http://www.goerie.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100531/NEWS02/305289889
Tip: Use our Essay Rewriter to rewrite this essay and remove plagiarism.
Next Tornado Essay: The Dangers Of Tornadoes

Add Notes

Have suggestions, comments or ideas? Please share below. Don't forget to tag a friend or classmate.
clear
Formatting Help
Submit