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The breaststroke is the oldest known swimming stroke and is one of four strokes used in competitive swimming. This stroke is also very popular in leisure swimming because the head can be held up, making vision and breathing easy and because the swimmer can rest between strokes if needed. Swimmers can also use the breaststroke in survival swimming and in lifesaving situations. Since the breaststroke has many uses and is easy to learn, it is one of the best strokes to teach a beginning swimmer. When teaching the breaststroke to a beginner, it is very important to explain every aspect of the stroke from head to toe. The head should be positioned so the hairline is at the surface of the water, keeping the body horizontal. The arm motions of the breaststroke are performed simultaneously, moving in opposite directions. The leg motions are performed in the same fashion. Lifting the hips as the hands are extended in front, then lifting the upper body as the hands finish and start to recover creates a rocking action. This rocking action is an automatic movement if the stroke is performed correctly. In the glide, the body is flat, prone, and streamlined, with the legs together and extended straight out. Keeping the palms down, extend the arms in front of the head. Angle the hands slightly downward and turn the palms outward at a 45-degree angle to the surface of the water. With the arms straight, press the palms directly out until the hands are spread wider than the shoulders. From this position, bend the elbows and sweep the hands downward and outward until they pass under the elbows with the forearms vertical. At this point, rotate the wrists and sweep the hands inward, upward, and back slightly toward the feet until the palms are below the chin, facing each other and almost touching. Elbow position is important for good propulsion. The elbows are to be higher than the hands, lower than the shoulders pointing outward, not backward. They should not pass back beyond the shoulders. Recovery of the arms should be immediate. After pulling the hands towards each other continue squeezing the elbows inward. Then, with palms angled towards each other, extend the arms forward to a glide position below the surface of the water and rotate the wrists until hands are palms down. While arm motions are critical to this stroke, the movements of the legs is equally as important. The kick for the breaststroke uses a continuous whipping action. Press the feet outward and backward until the feet and ankles touch, extending the ankles, lifting the legs and feet slightly. Forward movement results from the pressure of water against the soles and the insides of the feet and lower legs. From the glide position, start to recover the legs by bending your hips and knees and bringing the heels up towards the buttocks. With this action, gradually separate the knees and heels until the knees are hip-width apart and the feet are outside the knees. Keep the heels just under the surface of the water and rotate the ankles outward to engage the water with the soles of the feet. The strongest propulsion comes from drawing the feet as far forward as possible. All of the arm and leg movements must coincide with particular breathing patterns. Breathing correctly is an important aspect of all swimming, including the breaststroke. As the arms and hands start to pull backward, begin lifting the head to breathe. Near the end of the arm pull, the mouth should just clear the surface of the water as the swimmer inhales. As the arms start to recover, lower the face into the water. Exhale in a slow, steady manner, mostly through the mouth, from the time of the arm recovery, until just before the next breath. At that point explosively exhale and begin lifting the head for the next breath. Breathe during each arm stroke. Once all of the various aspects of the stroke are understood, timing is crucial. Each aspect of the stroke is essential to its proper execution. A swimmer can remember the timing of the stroke with the phrase, pull and breathe, kick and glide. Even with its intricate process and its many details, the breaststroke remains one of the best strokes to teach a beginning swimmer.
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How to Swim the Breaststroke Technique essay
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How To Swim The Breaststroke Technique Essay

Words: 722    Pages: 3    Paragraphs: 7    Sentences: 43    Read Time: 02:37
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              The breaststroke is the oldest known swimming stroke and is one of four strokes used in competitive swimming. This stroke is also very popular in leisure swimming because the head can be held up, making vision and breathing easy and because the swimmer can rest between strokes if needed. Swimmers can also use the breaststroke in survival swimming and in lifesaving situations. Since the breaststroke has many uses and is easy to learn, it is one of the best strokes to teach a beginning swimmer.
             
             
              When teaching the breaststroke to a beginner, it is very important to explain every aspect of the stroke from head to toe. The head should be positioned so the hairline is at the surface of the water, keeping the body horizontal. The arm motions of the breaststroke are performed simultaneously, moving in opposite directions. The leg motions are performed in the same fashion. Lifting the hips as the hands are extended in front, then lifting the upper body as the hands finish and start to recover creates a rocking action. This rocking action is an automatic movement if the stroke is performed correctly.
             
              In the glide, the body is flat, prone, and streamlined, with the legs together and extended straight out. Keeping the palms down, extend the arms in front of the head. Angle the hands slightly downward and turn the palms outward at a 45-degree angle to the surface of the water. With the arms straight, press the palms directly out until the hands are spread wider than the shoulders. From this position, bend the elbows and sweep the hands downward and outward until they pass under the elbows with the forearms vertical. At this point, rotate the wrists and sweep the hands inward, upward, and back slightly toward the feet until the palms are below the chin, facing each other and almost touching. Elbow position is important for good propulsion. The elbows are to be higher than the hands, lower than the shoulders pointing outward, not backward. They should not pass back beyond the shoulders.
             
              Recovery of the arms should be immediate. After pulling the hands towards each other continue squeezing the elbows inward. Then, with palms angled towards each other, extend the arms forward to a glide position below the surface of the water and rotate the wrists until hands are palms down. While arm motions are critical to this stroke, the movements of the legs is equally as important.
             
              The kick for the breaststroke uses a continuous whipping action. Press the feet outward and backward until the feet and ankles touch, extending the ankles, lifting the legs and feet slightly. Forward movement results from the pressure of water against the soles and the insides of the feet and lower legs. From the glide position, start to recover the legs by bending your hips and knees and bringing the heels up towards the buttocks. With this action, gradually separate the knees and heels until the knees are hip-width apart and the feet are outside the knees. Keep the heels just under the surface of the water and rotate the ankles outward to engage the water with the soles of the feet. The strongest propulsion comes from drawing the feet as far forward as possible. All of the arm and leg movements must coincide with particular breathing patterns.
             
              Breathing correctly is an important aspect of all swimming, including the breaststroke. As the arms and hands start to pull backward, begin lifting the head to breathe. Near the end of the arm pull, the mouth should just clear the surface of the water as the swimmer inhales. As the arms start to recover, lower the face into the water. Exhale in a slow, steady manner, mostly through the mouth, from the time of the arm recovery, until just before the next breath. At that point explosively exhale and begin lifting the head for the next breath. Breathe during each arm stroke. Once all of the various aspects of the stroke are understood, timing is crucial.
             
              Each aspect of the stroke is essential to its proper execution. A swimmer can remember the timing of the stroke with the phrase, pull and breathe, kick and glide. Even with its intricate process and its many details, the breaststroke remains one of the best strokes to teach a beginning swimmer.
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