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We are interested in this topic of the access to contraception because we believe that teen sex rates are high. The topic is important to us because we are teens and many of our peers are having sex. Teens who have access to contraceptives compared to those who don't may or may not have sex just as much. Teens that are sexually active don't always use the contraceptives available. Would these teens use them if they were more available? Does the availability of contraceptives effect the sexual decisions of teens? Our first article was called "The demand for contraception: the challenge continues" which was published in Women's Health Journal. A special day, August 3, has been created for family planning. It was created to educate people about contraception. The access to contraception helps couples decide a desirable number of children and protects women's health. It protects women's health by reducing health risks such as abortions, adolescent pregnancy, and STI's. Contraception improves a woman's quality of life and reduces poverty rates. Worldwide, it has become an international agreement to meet the urgent need for contraception. Over 500,000 women died from pregnancy related complications. One in three of the deaths could have been prevented with the access to contraception. International Planned Parenthood Federation insured that the access to contraception can prevent unintended pregnancies, unwanted births, abortions, and death related pregnancies. The access to contraception can be very beneficial to women and it may help prevent many deaths. We feel that this article believes the use of contraception is beneficial to women. The article compared several countries from 1990 to 2007 on the increased use of contraception and they each went up about ten percent. We don't feel that this is an important fact. The article stated many facts that were easily agreeable, rather then opinions. "The demand for contraception: the challenge continues" was helpful in our search to answer the topic question, "Does access to contraception promote teen sex?". The next article we researched was "Teen Sexuality: Developing Healthy Views" from Vibrant Life written by Claudette E. Jones. A female as young as 14 is being pressured into sexual activity by her boyfriend of less than one month. She took the initiative to go on birth control before any sexual activity. She is one of thousands of teenagers who become sexually active everyday due to peer pressure and curiosity. Unknowingly, many teens are engaging in sexual activity before they can understand the emotional and physical consequences. It is not adults intentions to hide sexual behavior from adolescents, they just want to teach them the appropriate time to become sexually active. It is safe to say that the media takes up a majority of teenagers time. On the TV shows they show no mention of contraception and it makes teens imagine there is no such thing. The explicit messages given from these TV programs show no responsibility or control of sexual activity. While schools are providing sex education courses they are not providing appropriate knowledge of contraception. Parents don't necessarily take the initiative to educate their children on the subject of sex and contraception. It is important for parents to make their teens feel comfortable in discussing this particular subject. Parents need to listen to their teens feedback as well. Informing teens about peer pressure can effect the outcome as well. The only form of contraception that is 100 percent effective is abstinence.The young girl that was pressured learned this information. She responsibly sought help before making the choice to become sexually active. Jones' article took a different approach in showing us the facts on contraception. We can relate more to this article because it started with a scenario about a teenage girl and her attempt to get birth control. We feel that this article didn't agree with the reasoning the young girl gave to get on birth control. They described the roles that the media plays on teenage lives. Jones took the time that no one else would to inform the young girl about the consequences of sexual activity. This article took a different approach in answering our question, "Does the access to contraception promote teenage sex?". Our last article was from National Review called "A moral choice: would Norplant simply stop unwanted pregnancies - or increase destructive teen sex?" written by Douglas J. Besharov. A new form of contraception was released in 1990 called Norplant. Norplant is an implantable contraceptive being pushed to become available in high school clinics. Many people are concerned that access to contraceptives in high schools will promote teen sex. Sexual activity has increased by 80 percent from 1970 to 1988. Because of the increase of sexual activity, the rate of abortions, STD's, and teen pregnancies have increased as well. Birth control pills came out in the 1960's and surveys showed an increase in sexual activity. Neuhaus believes that when Norplant becomes available, sexual activity among teens will increase. Norplant is a form of birth control that is really only for girls who have sex frequently. Norplant was offered to the Laurence Paquin school in Baltimore, which is a school for pregnant teens. There is about one million teenage pregnancies and 1.6 million abortions each year.One would assume women know that condoms can fail and the consequences of missing just one pill. Missing even one day puts females at risk for a pregnancy. Many times girls spend the night at different places and forget to take their pills along with them. Norplant avoids the issues of forgetting to take the pill and losing the pill. Most people who see themselves having a successful life are less sexually active than those who don't have a plan for the future. Norplant is beneficial in that it greatly reduces the amount of teen pregnancies but many feel that it will increase teen sex. Do we feel that Norplant should be offered in school setting? Depending on the situation, we feel it would be appropriate. We liked this article because it focused on one particular form of contraception rather then contraception in general. Besharov believes that Norplant would greatly decrease the number of teen pregnancies and abortions worldwide. We felt that this article was most important in answering our question, "Does the access to contraception promote teen sex?". Now, back to the topic, does the access to contraception promote teen sex? These articles feel that the access to contraception promotes teen sex. We feel however, that by just reading and researching this topic we cannot conclude this question. While our articles were very knowledgeable we still feel that they were very persuasive as well.
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The Access to Contraceptives Help Promote Teen Sex
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The Access To Contraceptives Help Promote Teen Sex

Words: 1107    Pages: 4    Paragraphs: 10    Sentences: 79    Read Time: 04:01
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              We are interested in this topic of the access to contraception because we believe that teen sex rates are high. The topic is important to us because we are teens and many of our peers are having sex. Teens who have access to contraceptives compared to those who don't may or may not have sex just as much. Teens that are sexually active don't always use the contraceptives available. Would these teens use them if they were more available? Does the availability of contraceptives effect the sexual decisions of teens?
             
             
              Our first article was called "The demand for contraception: the challenge continues" which was published in Women's Health Journal. A special day, August 3, has been created for family planning. It was created to educate people about contraception. The access to contraception helps couples decide a desirable number of children and protects women's health. It protects women's health by reducing health risks such as abortions, adolescent pregnancy, and STI's. Contraception improves a woman's quality of life and reduces poverty rates.
             
              Worldwide, it has become an international agreement to meet the urgent need for contraception. Over 500,000 women died from pregnancy related complications. One in three of the deaths could have been prevented with the access to contraception. International Planned Parenthood Federation insured that the access to contraception can prevent unintended pregnancies, unwanted births, abortions, and death related pregnancies. The access to contraception can be very beneficial to women and it may help prevent many deaths.
             
              We feel that this article believes the use of contraception is beneficial to women. The article compared several countries from 1990 to 2007 on the increased use of contraception and they each went up about ten percent. We don't feel that this is an important fact. The article stated many facts that were easily agreeable, rather then opinions. "The demand for contraception: the challenge continues" was helpful in our search to answer the topic question, "Does access to contraception promote teen sex? ".
             
              The next article we researched was "Teen Sexuality: Developing Healthy Views" from Vibrant Life written by Claudette E. Jones. A female as young as 14 is being pressured into sexual activity by her boyfriend of less than one month. She took the initiative to go on birth control before any sexual activity. She is one of thousands of teenagers who become sexually active everyday due to peer pressure and curiosity. Unknowingly, many teens are engaging in sexual activity before they can understand the emotional and physical consequences.
             
              It is not adults intentions to hide sexual behavior from adolescents, they just want to teach them the appropriate time to become sexually active. It is safe to say that the media takes up a majority of teenagers time. On the TV shows they show no mention of contraception and it makes teens imagine there is no such thing. The explicit messages given from these TV programs show no responsibility or control of sexual activity. While schools are providing sex education courses they are not providing appropriate knowledge of contraception. Parents don't necessarily take the initiative to educate their children on the subject of sex and contraception. It is important for parents to make their teens feel comfortable in discussing this particular subject. Parents need to listen to their teens feedback as well. Informing teens about peer pressure can effect the outcome as well. The only form of contraception that is 100 percent effective is abstinence. The young girl that was pressured learned this information. She responsibly sought help before making the choice to become sexually active. Jones' article took a different approach in showing us the facts on contraception. We can relate more to this article because it started with a scenario about a teenage girl and her attempt to get birth control. We feel that this article didn't agree with the reasoning the young girl gave to get on birth control. They described the roles that the media plays on teenage lives. Jones took the time that no one else would to inform the young girl about the consequences of sexual activity. This article took a different approach in answering our question, "Does the access to contraception promote teenage sex? ".
             
              Our last article was from National Review called "A moral choice: would Norplant simply stop unwanted pregnancies - or increase destructive teen sex? " written by Douglas J. Besharov. A new form of contraception was released in 1990 called Norplant. Norplant is an implantable contraceptive being pushed to become available in high school clinics. Many people are concerned that access to contraceptives in high schools will promote teen sex. Sexual activity has increased by 80 percent from 1970 to 1988. Because of the increase of sexual activity, the rate of abortions, STD's, and teen pregnancies have increased as well. Birth control pills came out in the 1960's and surveys showed an increase in sexual activity. Neuhaus believes that when Norplant becomes available, sexual activity among teens will increase.
             
              Norplant is a form of birth control that is really only for girls who have sex frequently. Norplant was offered to the Laurence Paquin school in Baltimore, which is a school for pregnant teens. There is about one million teenage pregnancies and 1. 6 million abortions each year. One would assume women know that condoms can fail and the consequences of missing just one pill. Missing even one day puts females at risk for a pregnancy. Many times girls spend the night at different places and forget to take their pills along with them.
             
              Norplant avoids the issues of forgetting to take the pill and losing the pill. Most people who see themselves having a successful life are less sexually active than those who don't have a plan for the future. Norplant is beneficial in that it greatly reduces the amount of teen pregnancies but many feel that it will increase teen sex.
             
              Do we feel that Norplant should be offered in school setting? Depending on the situation, we feel it would be appropriate. We liked this article because it focused on one particular form of contraception rather then contraception in general. Besharov believes that Norplant would greatly decrease the number of teen pregnancies and abortions worldwide. We felt that this article was most important in answering our question, "Does the access to contraception promote teen sex? ". Now, back to the topic, does the access to contraception promote teen sex? These articles feel that the access to contraception promotes teen sex. We feel however, that by just reading and researching this topic we cannot conclude this question. While our articles were very knowledgeable we still feel that they were very persuasive as well.
Birth Control Essay 
+2
Besharov, Douglas J. "A moral choice: would Norplant simply stop unwanted pregnancies." NationalNews 9 Aug. 1993: 50. General OneFile.

Web. 19 Jan. 2012."The demand for contraception: the challenge continues." Women's Health Journal July-Aug. 2011: 2.General OneFile.

Web. 19 Jan. 2012.Jones, Claudette E. "Teen sexuality - developing healthy views." Vibrant Life Sept.-Oct. 1994: 20.General OneFile. Web. 19 Jan. 2012.
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