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Dissatisfied and isolated in prison, Martin Luther King receives a letter from religious leaders demanding him to "wait" even though African Americans have been waiting for over centuries for justice. Dr. King is opposed to changing his plan, and he does reply vigorously. Exposing how inhumane the segregation system has been, Dr. King emphasizes that the end of it is eminent. In the same way, He denounces the lack of will by the government to execute reforms. As reveals Dr. King, even the church was in total silence and complicit of the abuse. Reading "Letter from Birmingham" allow us to understand why Dr. King has been the greatest international fighter for freedom. An exception among Blacks, Dr. King was a well-educated priest who renounces to any kind of personal gain as well as to a higher standard of living in order to deliver freedom and relief to millions of people. What is more, he was not a narcissistic hero attempting to take advantage and enrich himself at the expense of the mistreatment of others. Honor was paramount to him. To have been incarcerated at the time must have been very frustrating for Dr. King, whose only crime was to peacefully demonstrate how immoral segregation was. That is why the universal connotation of his movement, which evolved from the bottom not for economic reasons, though for the pursuit of liberty. Extremely dispirited by the feeble tone of "A Call for Unity," Dr. King considers segregation a human abomination, worth the fight. Firstly, slavery was not abolished under the Declaration of Independence nor under the Constitution since many revolutionary leaders, who were also slaveholders, prioritized their own interest over freedom for all. Then segregation originated allowing for more humiliation of a race that had already gone through centuries of ill-treatment, as Dr. King exemplifies: "We have waited for more than 340 years for our constitutional and God-given rights" (815). In Birmingham, the city with the worst record for human rights violations and where police brutality against Negroes was notorious, Dr. King expresses that he cannot procrastinate his direct action plan, which creates such a tension that the government will not be able to ignore. He indicates that if applied correctly direct action would entail collecting facts, negotiating, and self-purifying. Nevertheless, peace is invoked throughout his discourse as a necessary stage for his struggle. He also affirms that: "freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed" (815). Equally important, Dr. King clarifies the fact that no one in America should be considered an "outsider" since traveling to locations where issues are presented is a noble cause and a duty. The transcendence of his leadership is palpable at the moment. In regard to the unlawfulness of the current laws, Dr. King asserts: "An unjust law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of god" (818). He goes further describing how complying with unjust laws is not the course of action of his movement. To resolve this matter, Dr. King proposes a comprehensive revision of every regulation impairing the development of an integrated and inclusive society. Dr. King's letter reaffirms the validity and moral legality of his fight. Thanks to Martin Luther King and the civil rights movement, the United States becomes the country everyone who loves freedom around the world looks up to. We must acknowledge and honor the fact that before the assassination of President Kennedy, Kennedy was determined to abrogate segregation once and for all. In the end, it took a war and the assassination of the three greatest Americans in the fight for liberty (President Lincoln, President Kennedy, and the civil rights leader Dr. King) to efface the evil of racial discrimination in America. Only after those tragic events did justice and liberty finally arrive in the 1960s. Since the end of the segregation period, enormous progress has been made in combating this plague. For that matter, under President Bill Clinton affirmative action was created affording more job opportunities for African Americans and other minorities. In this respect, the web-based library Wikipedia offers an interesting article indicating that "In the United States, affirmative action refers to equal opportunity employment measures that Federal contractors and subcontractors are legally required to adopt. These measures are intended to prevent discrimination against employees or applicants for employment, on the basis of `color, religion, sex, or national origin`." In like manner, different housing initiatives have been conducted albeit at local levels problems have been detected in their implementation. According to Marc Seitles, "Contrary to federal law, Hartford housing authorities were not allowing eligible families to use their Section Eight certificates outside city limits." Sporadically, this type of incident occurs, however, only at local or personal level, not as a set of guidelines by institutions. In sports, the accomplishments of African Americans are remarkable. Professional athletes like LeBron James, Dwayne wade, Ray Allen, and Chris Bosh (Miami, Heat) enjoy worldwide recognition. Even, Afro-Cuban baseball players like Orlando and Livan Hernandez have had successful careers in the U.S. Nowhere in the universe could this stories have happened but in America. In recent decades the federal government has implemented a number of programs intended for the outgrowth of minorities in areas such as education, housing, and employment. Strong commitment to promoting new initiatives by Congress is unquestionable. Referring to new strategies aimed at assisting minorities Cord Jefferson mentions, "In order to jump-start early public education, Obama's main strategy has been his Race to the Top grant program. Using a point system that rewards things like "improved teacher effectiveness" and "making education funding a priority," the Department of Education then doles out grants to the highest-achieving states." When America elected its first Black president, President Obama, it became clear that we were leading the world as far as eradicating racial discrimination. We showed the world how especial our melting-pot has become. To a great extent, America is well beyond the rest of the world. Quite the opposite, European countries with a black population, namely Great Britain, France, or Spain not even score a sole Black representative in their parliaments yet. On the other hand, diversity is one of the characteristics enabling our government to find solutions for our multiethnic society. Just as Cuban descendant senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Robert Menendez (D-NJ) represent Hispanic communities, other senators from different communities respond to the needs of many ethnic groups. After all, segregation was not an American invention. America strove against it. Indeed, segregation was the vestige yielded by centuries of European feudalism and colonialism. To conclude, history proved Dr. King right. Confronting segregation in a direct and nonviolent strategic produced the intended results. Dr. King's dream of equality and harmony among all Americans has been assimilated positively by our society in a general way. Whether in politics, sports, business, or other areas, the success of members of the African American community has contributed tremendously to the development of our country. On no account should we forget the sacrifices made by members of the civil rights movement led by Dr. King. And all Americans, regardless of their race, should thank Dr. King and his followers for providing us with a society exempted from racial prejudices. So, thanks Dr. King!
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The History and Life of Martin Luther King
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The History And Life Of Martin Luther King

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              Dissatisfied and isolated in prison, Martin Luther King receives a letter from religious leaders demanding him to "wait" even though African Americans have been waiting for over centuries for justice. Dr. King is opposed to changing his plan, and he does reply vigorously. Exposing how inhumane the segregation system has been, Dr. King emphasizes that the end of it is eminent. In the same way, He denounces the lack of will by the government to execute reforms. As reveals Dr. King, even the church was in total silence and complicit of the abuse. Reading "Letter from Birmingham" allow us to understand why Dr. King has been the greatest international fighter for freedom.
             
              An exception among Blacks, Dr. King was a well-educated priest who renounces to any kind of personal gain as well as to a higher standard of living in order to deliver freedom and relief to millions of people. What is more, he was not a narcissistic hero attempting to take advantage and enrich himself at the expense of the mistreatment of others. Honor was paramount to him. To have been incarcerated at the time must have been very frustrating for Dr. King, whose only crime was to peacefully demonstrate how immoral segregation was. That is why the universal connotation of his movement, which evolved from the bottom not for economic reasons, though for the pursuit of liberty. Extremely dispirited by the feeble tone of "A Call for Unity," Dr. King considers segregation a human abomination, worth the fight. Firstly, slavery was not abolished under the Declaration of Independence nor under the Constitution since many revolutionary leaders, who were also slaveholders, prioritized their own interest over freedom for all. Then segregation originated allowing for more humiliation of a race that had already gone through centuries of ill-treatment, as Dr. King exemplifies: "We have waited for more than 340 years for our constitutional and God-given rights" (815).
             
              In Birmingham, the city with the worst record for human rights violations and where police brutality against Negroes was notorious, Dr. King expresses that he cannot procrastinate his direct action plan, which creates such a tension that the government will not be able to ignore. He indicates that if applied correctly direct action would entail collecting facts, negotiating, and self-purifying. Nevertheless, peace is invoked throughout his discourse as a necessary stage for his struggle. He also affirms that: "freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed" (815). Equally important, Dr. King clarifies the fact that no one in America should be considered an "outsider" since traveling to locations where issues are presented is a noble cause and a duty. The transcendence of his leadership is palpable at the moment.
             
              In regard to the unlawfulness of the current laws, Dr. King asserts: "An unjust law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of god" (818). He goes further describing how complying with unjust laws is not the course of action of his movement. To resolve this matter, Dr. King proposes a comprehensive revision of every regulation impairing the development of an integrated and inclusive society. Dr. King's letter reaffirms the validity and moral legality of his fight. Thanks to Martin Luther King and the civil rights movement, the United States becomes the country everyone who loves freedom around the world looks up to. We must acknowledge and honor the fact that before the assassination of President Kennedy, Kennedy was determined to abrogate segregation once and for all. In the end, it took a war and the assassination of the three greatest Americans in the fight for liberty (President Lincoln, President Kennedy, and the civil rights leader Dr. King) to efface the evil of racial discrimination in America. Only after those tragic events did justice and liberty finally arrive in the 1960s.
             
              Since the end of the segregation period, enormous progress has been made in combating this plague. For that matter, under President Bill Clinton affirmative action was created affording more job opportunities for African Americans and other minorities. In this respect, the web-based library Wikipedia offers an interesting article indicating that "In the United States, affirmative action refers to equal opportunity employment measures that Federal contractors and subcontractors are legally required to adopt. These measures are intended to prevent discrimination against employees or applicants for employment, on the basis of `color, religion, sex, or national origin`. " In like manner, different housing initiatives have been conducted albeit at local levels problems have been detected in their implementation. According to Marc Seitles, "Contrary to federal law, Hartford housing authorities were not allowing eligible families to use their Section Eight certificates outside city limits. " Sporadically, this type of incident occurs, however, only at local or personal level, not as a set of guidelines by institutions. In sports, the accomplishments of African Americans are remarkable. Professional athletes like LeBron James, Dwayne wade, Ray Allen, and Chris Bosh (Miami, Heat) enjoy worldwide recognition. Even, Afro-Cuban baseball players like Orlando and Livan Hernandez have had successful careers in the U. S. Nowhere in the universe could this stories have happened but in America.
             
              In recent decades the federal government has implemented a number of programs intended for the outgrowth of minorities in areas such as education, housing, and employment. Strong commitment to promoting new initiatives by Congress is unquestionable. Referring to new strategies aimed at assisting minorities Cord Jefferson mentions, "In order to jump-start early public education, Obama's main strategy has been his Race to the Top grant program. Using a point system that rewards things like "improved teacher effectiveness" and "making education funding a priority," the Department of Education then doles out grants to the highest-achieving states. " When America elected its first Black president, President Obama, it became clear that we were leading the world as far as eradicating racial discrimination. We showed the world how especial our melting-pot has become. To a great extent, America is well beyond the rest of the world. Quite the opposite, European countries with a black population, namely Great Britain, France, or Spain not even score a sole Black representative in their parliaments yet. On the other hand, diversity is one of the characteristics enabling our government to find solutions for our multiethnic society. Just as Cuban descendant senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Robert Menendez (D-NJ) represent Hispanic communities, other senators from different communities respond to the needs of many ethnic groups. After all, segregation was not an American invention. America strove against it. Indeed, segregation was the vestige yielded by centuries of European feudalism and colonialism.
             
              To conclude, history proved Dr. King right. Confronting segregation in a direct and nonviolent strategic produced the intended results. Dr. King's dream of equality and harmony among all Americans has been assimilated positively by our society in a general way. Whether in politics, sports, business, or other areas, the success of members of the African American community has contributed tremendously to the development of our country. On no account should we forget the sacrifices made by members of the civil rights movement led by Dr. King. And all Americans, regardless of their race, should thank Dr. King and his followers for providing us with a society exempted from racial prejudices. So, thanks Dr. King!
Martin Luther King Jr Essay 
Jefferson, Cord. "How Obama's Educational Policies Benefit Blacks" The root. n.pag. 28 Oct. 2010. Web. 13Sept. 2012.

Rottenburg, Annette T., and Donna Haisty Winchell. Letter from Birmingham Jail: Martin Luther King Jr. Elements of Argument: A text and Reader. 10th Edition. Boston, New York: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2011. 811-824. Print.

Seitles, Marc. "The Perpetuation of Residential Racial Segregation in America: Historical Discrimination, Modern Forms of Exclusion, and Inclusionary Remedies." Journal of Land and Law Enforcement. (1996) n.pag. 1996. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

"Executive Order 11246 [HYPERLINK: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/codification/executive-order/11246.html]--Equal employment opportunity." The Federal Register. n.pag. 30 March 2010. Web. 13 Sept 2012.
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