Essay Topics
Types of Essays
Essay Checklist
Word Counter
Readability Score
Essay Rewriter
Ntertainment comes in all shapes, sizes and forms. Whether you love to read, play video games, watch TV, listen to music or hang out with friends, everyone has their favorite pastime when it comes to having fun. One thing we can all relate to is sitting back in our favorite chair, lounging on the couch with a comfy blanket or if you're like me, kicking back on the 90's wrestling-themed bean bag chair while watching your favorite TV show. Shows can range from sitcoms, to cartoons, to talk shows, to game shows, to sports, to any number of other options and we all have our favorites-and our not-so-favorites. When I was growing up, I loved watching cartoons and other kids' shows and then grew into loving sitcoms as I got older. Eventually, sitcoms gave way to reality TV shows and most people who liked sitcoms started to like reality shows. Today, most shows are considered reality TV, but a lot of them resemble the sitcoms of yesteryear, just with a real life spin on them. However, recently, some people have started to believe that these shows are fake and that has given reality TV a bad reputation. It isn't the first genre of TV show to get a bad rap with accusations like this though. One genre of TV show in particular that people give a bad rap to by calling it fake or too cheesy is pro wrestling. I've watched wrestling since I was in middle school, whether it be wrestling companies of the that era like World Championship Wrestling (WCW) or Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW) or today's Ring of Honor (ROH), Total Non-stop Action (TNA) or the juggernaut that is World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) (formerly the World Wrestling Federation aka WWF, which now owns both defunct companies, ECW and WCW). Now, like any other fan of television, I have tons of other favorites, but if I were stuck on an island alone and could only watch one weekly show, it would be wrestling. My favorite wrestling company is definitely WWE. I like other organizations, and have watched most of the American companies over the years and even some of the Japanese and Mexican wrestling shows, but WWE has always been my favorite. There's just something about their product that trumps over the rest. I disagree with those who feel that wrestling isn't fun to watch by claiming that it's too cheesy, it's fake and that because it's portrayed as being real like boxing or other sports, but that because the outcomes are all scripted, it can't possibly be entertaining. While I understand this point of view, there are some problems with this argument. Let me establish something as clearly as I can: Calling wrestling fake is only a half-truth. It's almost the same as saying "Full House" or "Saved by the Bell" were fake-of course they were fake. Yes, the difference is that wrestling is usually portrayed as real, but if you understand how fictional TV shows work, that's done for the same reasons as it is done on sitcoms. Yes, sitcoms and even reality TV are portrayed as real-to a certain extent. You see, during the show, you never hear the characters refer to themselves as characters or hear them say that they are on TV, aside from some comedic breaking of the fourth wall. The fourth wall is a term that refers to the barrier between the audience and the show's cast. Having characters acknowledge that they are on a scripted TV show breaks that barrier. An example of this would be in "Saved by the Bell" when Mark-Paul Gosselaar's character, Zack Morris, would look at the audience and wink when a girl he liked expressed interest in him. Wrestling is portrayed as a real sport because there really is no fourth wall, so they create one, in order to keep the shows engaging for the fans, by making it seem like wins and losses are real and that the wrestlers actually hate each other. In recent years, WWE has dropped this fourth wall a lot more than in the past and they don't play it up as being real as much anymore except for when it comes to wins, losses and relationships. They don't refer to themselves as a sport anymore, but rather sports entertainment and the wrestlers constantly break the fourth wall by making references to the storylines being lame or by talking to the audience, which is usually used for comedic reasons. However, despite the actual in-ring action, backstage antics and the outcomes of the matches being staged, wrestlers put their bodies on the line more than most athletes and the legitimate injuries they sustain are very real. A WWE wrestler by the name of Stone Cold Steve Austin once had his neck broken during a match with another wrestler named Owen Hart (who died a year or so later due to an accident in the ring). This injury didn't stop him from wrestling but it definitely shortened his career. WCW wrestler Sid Vicious was in a match with fellow grappler, Goldberg, in which Vicious jumped from atop a turnbuckle (the corner posts that hold the ring ropes up) and landed all of his weight on one foot, snapping his ankle completely apart from his leg. You can find this video on YouTube, but it's pretty hard to watch. A legendary wrestler by the name of Mick Foley, whom I've met in person, wrestled in Japan early in his career in a barbed wire match (where the ropes are replaced with real barbed wire) and his ear was torn off after getting stuck on the barbed wire. He said in his autobiography that he didn't even know it happened until after the match, when a medic handed him his ear wrapped in a towel. In fact, that last one is a perfect example because the match ending was scripted, but the fact that Foley permanently lost one of his ears was not scripted, (Junk). A lot of people don't seem to give credit to the backgrounds of many of the wrestlers either. "Some pro-wrestlers are authenticated by amateur backgrounds, like Brock Lesnar and Olympic gold medal winner Kurt Angle. But Angle - a 'heel' (a bad guy in wrestling) who never shuts up about his medals and whose entrance music facilitates chants of 'You Suck!' - would not be so popular if he did not know how to 'work' a (staged) match. He has good microphone skills, can 'put over' his opponents (make them look good), and even lose convincingly to wrestlers who would not last very long in a 'real' match against him, (King 118)." It doesn't mean what they do in the ring isn't just as scripted, but it does add authenticity to the move sets these wrestlers possess. Angle and Lesnar's backgrounds certainly show in the ring. It not only allows them to have a realistic gimmick for their character, but it also lends itself to their in-ring skills and abilities. This is a great example of wrestling being scripted, but not exactly "fake". The thing that most people don't realize is that while wrestling is scripted and the wrestlers are merely actors portraying a character, being a pro wrestler requires years of training and practice, an extreme amount of athleticism, and an immense amount of charisma and dedication. Not only that, but wrestlers also must possess very strong speaking skills, the ability to protect their opponents in the ring, and the mental strength to focus while being aware of their surroundings in order to pull off moves safely, properly and effectively. They also have to travel a lot. "It's a job that keeps them on the road for 240 days each year. Maybe they stayed at a hotel 400 miles away that didn't put too much of a premium on cleanliness. It separates them from their families for incredible stretches of time," (Caprio). Even if people understand and respect all that, I don't get the ones that complain about wrestling being too cheesy or corny. Yeah the storylines can be pretty far-fetched, like wrestlers being lit on fire and not having burn marks the next week, or wrestlers getting broken arms only to be fine a month later, or the time that a female wrestler gave birth to a man's hand, but the people that say that's too cheesy to be entertaining are the same people who watch reality shows and sitcoms that are just as bad. I mean what family can afford to go out and do something fun (and expensive) every weekend, especially with 8 kids? Then there's the Dugger family with their 19 children, yet they manage to go to some event every week that must cost them a fortune, but you never see them go to work. Then there's that season of tattoo show, LA Ink, when the shop hired a manager in the first episode of the season, she created a bunch of drama all season long and then, like magic, she was fired in the season finale. Sitcoms are bad about this too like all the characters that drove cars into the house and the house was fixed in the next scene or all the shows depicting high school friends who rarely go to class and when they do, they all have the same classes together. Let's not forget about the fact that most sitcom houses were set up the exact same way, all had two stories no matter how rich or poor the family was and that the families always had some kind of reason to hang out in the kitchen together. I just find it funny that so many people can believe stuff like that but then they call wrestling cheesy or fake. In fact, most of the so-called reality shows are thought to be scripted too or at least have producers who add things to the show like actors to spruce up the drama, events to make them more interesting or use editing to manipulate the way relationships and situations come across to the viewer, (Poniewozik). Still, a lot of people are fooled by these shows and believe they are real, especially because many feature celebrities in their real surroundings. Though I've never been a big fan of reality TV, I can see why people like it; it's really not that different from wrestling. The thing is, wrestling fans don't watch wrestling because we think it's real. We don't watch it in order to see people get their ears ripped off either. We watch it because like any other form of entertainment, wrestling is fun to watch. Sure it's not as real as boxing, football, mixed martial arts, or hockey, but it's just as entertaining, if not more. One of the best things about wrestling is that it takes great actors, who are also amazing athletes, and combines them with entertaining and creative storylines that can be funny, sad, dramatic and everything in between. Wrestling organizations do this in a unique way that provides a connection to its audience, which crosses the line of the fourth wall in a way that isn't seen in any other form of entertainment. All it takes is a little bit of imagination, realizing that wrestling isn't anymore fake than a sitcom or a so-called reality TV show, getting rid of the idea that something fake can't be entertaining, as well as an appreciation of the skills, talents, and efforts on display from every wrestler that graces a wrestling ring to realize why approximately 12 million viewers in the U.S. tune into WWE programming each week, (Corporation). That number doesn't even include other wrestling organizations that are televised, live events like independent shows, or overseas wrestling. Bottom line, I honestly think if people look past their ill-conceived opinions of wrestling and actually give it a chance, they'd understand why it's considered by fans, including myself, as the greatest form of entertainment on the planet.
Essay Writing Checklist
The following guidelines are designed to give students a checklist to use, whether they are revising individually or as part of a peer review team.
Introduction
  • Is the main idea (i.e., the writer's opinion of the story title) stated clearly?
  • Is the introductory paragraph interesting? Does it make the reader want to keep on reading?
Body Paragraph
  • Does each body paragraph have a clear topic sentence that is related to the main idea of the essay?
  • Does each body paragraph include specific information from the text(including quoted evidence from the text, if required by the instructor)that supports the topic sentence?
  • Is there a clear plan for the order of the body paragraphs (i.e., order of importance, chronology in the story, etc.)?
  • Does each body paragraph transition smoothly to the next?
Conclusion
  • Is the main idea of the essay restated in different words?
  • Are the supporting ideas summarized succinctly and clearly?
  • Is the concluding paragraph interesting? Does it leave an impression on the reader?
Overall Essay
  • Is any important material left unsaid?
  • Is any material repetitious and unnecessary?
  • Has the writer tried to incorporate "voice" in the essay so that it has his/her distinctive mark?
  • Are there changes needed in word choice, sentence length and structure, etc.?
  • Are the quotations (if required) properly cited?
  • Has the essay been proofread for spelling, punctuation, grammar, etc.?
  • Does the essay have an interesting and appropriate title?
Why wrestling is the greatest form of entertainment on the planet
Trending Essay Topics
Explore today's trending essay topics:
Reference
Feel free to use content on this page for your website, blog or paper we only ask that you reference content back to us. Use the following code to link this page:
Terms · Privacy · Contact
Essay Topics © 2020

Why Wrestling Is The Greatest Form Of Entertainment On The Planet

Words: 2046    Pages: 7    Paragraphs: 13    Sentences: 74    Read Time: 07:26
Highlight Text to add correction. Use an editor to spell check essay.
              Ntertainment comes in all shapes, sizes and forms. Whether you love to read, play video games, watch TV, listen to music or hang out with friends, everyone has their favorite pastime when it comes to having fun. One thing we can all relate to is sitting back in our favorite chair, lounging on the couch with a comfy blanket or if you're like me, kicking back on the 90's wrestling-themed bean bag chair while watching your favorite TV show. Shows can range from sitcoms, to cartoons, to talk shows, to game shows, to sports, to any number of other options and we all have our favorites-and our not-so-favorites.
             
             
              When I was growing up, I loved watching cartoons and other kids' shows and then grew into loving sitcoms as I got older. Eventually, sitcoms gave way to reality TV shows and most people who liked sitcoms started to like reality shows. Today, most shows are considered reality TV, but a lot of them resemble the sitcoms of yesteryear, just with a real life spin on them. However, recently, some people have started to believe that these shows are fake and that has given reality TV a bad reputation. It isn't the first genre of TV show to get a bad rap with accusations like this though.
             
              One genre of TV show in particular that people give a bad rap to by calling it fake or too cheesy is pro wrestling. I've watched wrestling since I was in middle school, whether it be wrestling companies of the that era like World Championship Wrestling (WCW) or Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW) or today's Ring of Honor (ROH), Total Non-stop Action (TNA) or the juggernaut that is World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) (formerly the World Wrestling Federation aka WWF, which now owns both defunct companies, ECW and WCW). Now, like any other fan of television, I have tons of other favorites, but if I were stuck on an island alone and could only watch one weekly show, it would be wrestling.
             
              My favorite wrestling company is definitely WWE. I like other organizations, and have watched most of the American companies over the years and even some of the Japanese and Mexican wrestling shows, but WWE has always been my favorite. There's just something about their product that trumps over the rest. I disagree with those who feel that wrestling isn't fun to watch by claiming that it's too cheesy, it's fake and that because it's portrayed as being real like boxing or other sports, but that because the outcomes are all scripted, it can't possibly be entertaining.
             
              While I understand this point of view, there are some problems with this argument. Let me establish something as clearly as I can: Calling wrestling fake is only a half-truth. It's almost the same as saying "Full House" or "Saved by the Bell" were fake-of course they were fake. Yes, the difference is that wrestling is usually portrayed as real, but if you understand how fictional TV shows work, that's done for the same reasons as it is done on sitcoms. Yes, sitcoms and even reality TV are portrayed as real-to a certain extent. You see, during the show, you never hear the characters refer to themselves as characters or hear them say that they are on TV, aside from some comedic breaking of the fourth wall. The fourth wall is a term that refers to the barrier between the audience and the show's cast. Having characters acknowledge that they are on a scripted TV show breaks that barrier. An example of this would be in "Saved by the Bell" when Mark-Paul Gosselaar's character, Zack Morris, would look at the audience and wink when a girl he liked expressed interest in him.
             
              Wrestling is portrayed as a real sport because there really is no fourth wall, so they create one, in order to keep the shows engaging for the fans, by making it seem like wins and losses are real and that the wrestlers actually hate each other. In recent years, WWE has dropped this fourth wall a lot more than in the past and they don't play it up as being real as much anymore except for when it comes to wins, losses and relationships. They don't refer to themselves as a sport anymore, but rather sports entertainment and the wrestlers constantly break the fourth wall by making references to the storylines being lame or by talking to the audience, which is usually used for comedic reasons.
             
              However, despite the actual in-ring action, backstage antics and the outcomes of the matches being staged, wrestlers put their bodies on the line more than most athletes and the legitimate injuries they sustain are very real. A WWE wrestler by the name of Stone Cold Steve Austin once had his neck broken during a match with another wrestler named Owen Hart (who died a year or so later due to an accident in the ring). This injury didn't stop him from wrestling but it definitely shortened his career. WCW wrestler Sid Vicious was in a match with fellow grappler, Goldberg, in which Vicious jumped from atop a turnbuckle (the corner posts that hold the ring ropes up) and landed all of his weight on one foot, snapping his ankle completely apart from his leg. You can find this video on YouTube, but it's pretty hard to watch. A legendary wrestler by the name of Mick Foley, whom I've met in person, wrestled in Japan early in his career in a barbed wire match (where the ropes are replaced with real barbed wire) and his ear was torn off after getting stuck on the barbed wire. He said in his autobiography that he didn't even know it happened until after the match, when a medic handed him his ear wrapped in a towel. In fact, that last one is a perfect example because the match ending was scripted, but the fact that Foley permanently lost one of his ears was not scripted, (Junk).
             
              A lot of people don't seem to give credit to the backgrounds of many of the wrestlers either. "Some pro-wrestlers are authenticated by amateur backgrounds, like Brock Lesnar and Olympic gold medal winner Kurt Angle. But Angle - a 'heel' (a bad guy in wrestling) who never shuts up about his medals and whose entrance music facilitates chants of 'You Suck! ' - would not be so popular if he did not know how to 'work' a (staged) match. He has good microphone skills, can 'put over' his opponents (make them look good), and even lose convincingly to wrestlers who would not last very long in a 'real' match against him, (King 118). " It doesn't mean what they do in the ring isn't just as scripted, but it does add authenticity to the move sets these wrestlers possess. Angle and Lesnar's backgrounds certainly show in the ring. It not only allows them to have a realistic gimmick for their character, but it also lends itself to their in-ring skills and abilities. This is a great example of wrestling being scripted, but not exactly "fake".
             
              The thing that most people don't realize is that while wrestling is scripted and the wrestlers are merely actors portraying a character, being a pro wrestler requires years of training and practice, an extreme amount of athleticism, and an immense amount of charisma and dedication. Not only that, but wrestlers also must possess very strong speaking skills, the ability to protect their opponents in the ring, and the mental strength to focus while being aware of their surroundings in order to pull off moves safely, properly and effectively. They also have to travel a lot. "It's a job that keeps them on the road for 240 days each year. Maybe they stayed at a hotel 400 miles away that didn't put too much of a premium on cleanliness. It separates them from their families for incredible stretches of time," (Caprio).
             
              Even if people understand and respect all that, I don't get the ones that complain about wrestling being too cheesy or corny. Yeah the storylines can be pretty far-fetched, like wrestlers being lit on fire and not having burn marks the next week, or wrestlers getting broken arms only to be fine a month later, or the time that a female wrestler gave birth to a man's hand, but the people that say that's too cheesy to be entertaining are the same people who watch reality shows and sitcoms that are just as bad. I mean what family can afford to go out and do something fun (and expensive) every weekend, especially with 8 kids? Then there's the Dugger family with their 19 children, yet they manage to go to some event every week that must cost them a fortune, but you never see them go to work. Then there's that season of tattoo show, LA Ink, when the shop hired a manager in the first episode of the season, she created a bunch of drama all season long and then, like magic, she was fired in the season finale. Sitcoms are bad about this too like all the characters that drove cars into the house and the house was fixed in the next scene or all the shows depicting high school friends who rarely go to class and when they do, they all have the same classes together.
             
              Let's not forget about the fact that most sitcom houses were set up the exact same way, all had two stories no matter how rich or poor the family was and that the families always had some kind of reason to hang out in the kitchen together. I just find it funny that so many people can believe stuff like that but then they call wrestling cheesy or fake. In fact, most of the so-called reality shows are thought to be scripted too or at least have producers who add things to the show like actors to spruce up the drama, events to make them more interesting or use editing to manipulate the way relationships and situations come across to the viewer, (Poniewozik). Still, a lot of people are fooled by these shows and believe they are real, especially because many feature celebrities in their real surroundings. Though I've never been a big fan of reality TV, I can see why people like it; it's really not that different from wrestling.
             
              The thing is, wrestling fans don't watch wrestling because we think it's real. We don't watch it in order to see people get their ears ripped off either. We watch it because like any other form of entertainment, wrestling is fun to watch. Sure it's not as real as boxing, football, mixed martial arts, or hockey, but it's just as entertaining, if not more. One of the best things about wrestling is that it takes great actors, who are also amazing athletes, and combines them with entertaining and creative storylines that can be funny, sad, dramatic and everything in between. Wrestling organizations do this in a unique way that provides a connection to its audience, which crosses the line of the fourth wall in a way that isn't seen in any other form of entertainment.
             
              All it takes is a little bit of imagination, realizing that wrestling isn't anymore fake than a sitcom or a so-called reality TV show, getting rid of the idea that something fake can't be entertaining, as well as an appreciation of the skills, talents, and efforts on display from every wrestler that graces a wrestling ring to realize why approximately 12 million viewers in the U. S. tune into WWE programming each week, (Corporation). That number doesn't even include other wrestling organizations that are televised, live events like independent shows, or overseas wrestling. Bottom line, I honestly think if people look past their ill-conceived opinions of wrestling and actually give it a chance, they'd understand why it's considered by fans, including myself, as the greatest form of entertainment on the planet.
Wrestling Essay 
Caprio, Robert. Are We There Yet? Travels of WWE Superstars. 1st ed. . United States: World Wrestling Entertainment, Simon & Shuster (Pocket Books), 2005. Intro. Print.

Corporation, World Wrestling Entertainment. "Company Overview." Company Overview: WWE Audience. WWE Corporate, 2012. Web. 8 Oct 2012. .

Junk, Retro. "Wrestling's Worst Injuries." Retro Junk - Your Memory Machine. Retro Junk, 2006. Web. 8 Oct 2012. .

King , Geoff. The Spectacle of the Real : From Hollywood to 'rea'lity TV and Beyond. 1st ed. . Portland, Oregon : Intellect Books, 2005. 118. Print.

Poniewozik, James. "How Reality TV Fakes It." Time Magazine. 29 2006: n. page. Print.
Tip: Use our Essay Rewriter to rewrite this essay and remove plagiarism.

Add Notes

Have suggestions, comments or ideas? Please share below. Don't forget to tag a friend or classmate.
clear
Formatting Help
Submit