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Teachers' Education Not only do the rapid growth of technology changed the way we live, from the way business is conducted to the way we communicate with each other, technology advancements are also affecting the way we teach and learn. According to the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), new skills needed in the workplace are catalysts that spur technology use in the classroom. It is clear that the business world demand schools to prepare educated workers who are skilled at working in teams, can effectively solve problems, are able to process and apply information, and who can use technology effectively in the global market place in order to maximize productivity. Thus, the challenges and educational goals for schools should focus on creating appropriate learning environments that integrate technology as well as foster the needed skills to empower students. This paper describes the characteristics of teacher-centered classrooms and student-centered learning environment. In addition, this paper will explain the significance of teacher education for the effective implementation of technology as well as student-centered learning environment in K-12 classrooms. In the traditional teacher-centered classroom, teachers are expected to be the subject matter experts. They present the information in textbooks and when students asked questions, it is the job of the teacher to guide the students to think in such a way that they arrive at 'correct' answers (Carter, 1997). Students are also expected to learn factual-based knowledge and assessment is often based on the information they delivered from their rote skills. In the 21st century classroom, the role of teachers is to facilitate learning by coordinating learning resources and help students to learn to ask the right questions. Teachers must direct students toward the vast information available and help them to develop their skills in critical thinking, problem solving and decision making. Student-centered teaching are encouraged in which students participate in discovery learning and assessment is often based on group as well as individual project portfolios. With the impact of technology in the classrooms and the drastic change in the role of teachers, the learning environments also need major reform. According to the recommendation of the National Educational Technology Standard provided by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), the student-centered teaching environments should be as followed: Moving from Traditional to Student-centered Learning Environments Traditional Classroom Student-Centered Classroom Teacher-centered instruction Student-centered instruction Single sense stimulation Multisensory stimulation Single path Multipath progression Single media Multimedia Isolated work Collaborative work Information delivered Information exchange Passive learning Active/exploratory/inquiry-based learning Factual, knowledge-based Critical thinking, informed decision-making Reactive response Proactive/planned action However, ISTE's recommendation of this model learning environment of the new classroom would not materialize without teachers' understanding and appreciation of what technology can do to enhance their teaching; thus, promoting student learning. Technology in the 21st century classroom, if implemented appropriately, should enrich the learning environment by using it effectively as a medium of instruction or a tool to enhance student learning. It should be embedded in the curriculum and flow seamlessly with the content. The significance of teacher education for the effective implementation of technology and student-centered learning environment in K-12 classrooms According to Norman (1997), appropriate design for education technology supports the teacher-student relationship by enabling teachers to create student-centered learning environments. Computer technology offers attributes that allow a shift toward problem-based learning and a chance for students to learn in the ways they learn best. Teachers will be able to propose more ambitious challenges, tailor guidance to individual student and team needs, and give more detailed evaluation. Integrated classroom tools should support creative, collaborative work among students and teachers. However, the way teachers choose to use technology is ultimately based on their knowledge and skill level in technology which brings about the significance of teachers' training in technology. Many educator, parents and students believe integrating technology in education seemed to be the answer to school restructuring in order to improve educational outcomes. They equate high-tech classroom environment to high-quality education. According to the Quality Educational Data's 1997 Educational Technology Trends report, billions of dollars are spent in computer hardware and software in the nation's kindergarten through twelve grade classrooms (Dyrli, 1998). While many barriers to technology use exist, the national survey conducted by the Milken Exchange on Education Technology stated currently the biggest barrier to schools in effectively using technology are the teachers' lack of understanding and skill in using technology and the lack of quality, informed technology planning by educators. This report indicated teachers' and school administrators' inability to employ technology effectively to promote student learning will result in the waste of billions of dollars being invested in educational technology (Fulton, 1998). Thus, it is important to educate school administrators the importance of empowering teachers to provide the best education for every student by training teachers to use technology effectively to promote student learning (Milone, 1998). Meanwhile, in light of all the changes in the classrooms due to the impact of technology, many inservice teachers feel that they have not had adequate training to help them use technology effectively. According to Bradshaw's article, teachers' concerns about technology vary broadly. Many teachers admit they know very little about computers and are not interested in learning (Bradshaw, 1997). While others may try to seek new uses for technology in the classroom but do not have sufficient technical support. They see the value of technology but they feel frustrated because they are not trained to use these resources in the classroom setting (Faison, 1996). For the enthusiastic teachers who want to learn, staff development in technological skills as well as alternative classroom management skills and sufficient technical and administrative support are essential to the success of effective use of technology in the classroom. For the retiring teachers who are expected to be replaced by more than 2 million new teachers, integrating technology in the teacher education programs is vital to the success of the envisioned 21st century classrooms (NCATE, 1997). According to the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), the most obvious place to provide training in effective use of technology and to promote student-centered learning environment is in the nation's teacher education programs. It is the most direct and cost-effective way to educate teachers about technology. According to the NCATE, when funding for resources is made available, most funds are spent on hardware and software, not on training. Thus, teacher education faculty also lacks the knowledge and skill to incorporate technology into their own teaching. They fail to model instructional technology use in their professional education courses because they are not equipped to do so. Students of teacher education programs, therefore, lack the necessary skills to lead the 21st century classroom. Willingness to change in the current education system is the key if teacher preparation programs are to serve the needs of schools. Colleges and universities need to improve technology accessibility to faculty and students throughout the system. More funding needs to be allocated toward the much needed technology training for professors as well as to increase technical support to faculty members who are seeking help to incorporate technology into their courses. In addition, faculty needs the support and recognition from their department administrators and to allow faculty the time as well as the necessary resources to redesign the course curriculum in order to incorporate technology (Hill & Somers, 1996). In conclusion, the key to the success of technology in the classroom as well as implementing student-center learning environments depend on the level of training teachers have. Technology itself is merely a tool to support development of programs; programs which teachers are expected to develop. Thus, teachers must be well trained and have sufficient support to implement technology in their classroom. With the combination of learning and experiencing the concept of student-centered learning environment, integrating technology in the teacher preparation programs, training of inservice K-12 teachers as well as faculty in higher education, preservice teachers will have the necessary knowledge and skills to implement the integration of technology in the 21st century classroom. Well trained preservice teachers also have the potential to be leaders in the technological revolution that is taking place in the traditional classrooms by modeling effective use of technology. We live in a technology-driven world and the need of instructional technology must not be ignored. In order to accomplish the vision of implementing technology in the classrooms, colleges of education must be committed to sustained funding in establishing and maintaining comprehensive instructional technology sound teacher education programs. If the goal of education is truly intended to be one of improved student learning at any level, this investment must be made.
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Teachers' Education Essay
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Teachers' Education Essay

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              Teachers' Education
             
              Not only do the rapid growth of technology changed the way we live, from the way business is conducted to the way we communicate with each other, technology advancements are also affecting the way we teach and learn. According to the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), new skills needed in the workplace are catalysts that spur technology use in the classroom. It is clear that the business world demand schools to prepare educated workers who are skilled at working in teams, can effectively solve problems, are able to process and apply information, and who can use technology effectively in the global market place in order to maximize productivity. Thus, the challenges and educational goals for schools should focus on creating appropriate learning environments that integrate technology as well as foster the needed skills to empower students. This paper describes the characteristics of teacher-centered classrooms and student-centered learning environment. In addition, this paper will explain the significance of teacher education for the effective implementation of technology as well as student-centered learning environment in K-12 classrooms.
             
              In the traditional teacher-centered classroom, teachers are expected to be the subject matter experts. They present the information in textbooks and when students asked questions, it is the job of the teacher to guide the students to think in such a way that they arrive at 'correct' answers (Carter, 1997). Students are also expected to learn factual-based knowledge and assessment is often based on the information they delivered from their rote skills. In the 21st century classroom, the role of teachers is to facilitate learning by coordinating learning resources and help students to learn to ask the right questions. Teachers must direct students toward the vast information available and help them to develop their skills in critical thinking, problem solving and decision making. Student-centered teaching are encouraged in which students participate in discovery learning and assessment is often based on group as well as individual project portfolios.
             
              With the impact of technology in the classrooms and the drastic change in the role of teachers, the learning environments also need major reform. According to the recommendation of the National Educational Technology Standard provided by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), the student-centered teaching environments should be as followed:
             
              Moving from Traditional to Student-centered Learning Environments
             
              Traditional Classroom Student-Centered Classroom
              Teacher-centered instruction Student-centered instruction
              Single sense stimulation Multisensory stimulation
              Single path Multipath progression
              Single media Multimedia
              Isolated work Collaborative work
              Information delivered Information exchange
              Passive learning Active/exploratory/inquiry-based learning
              Factual, knowledge-based Critical thinking, informed decision-making
              Reactive response Proactive/planned action
             
              However, ISTE's recommendation of this model learning environment of the new classroom would not materialize without teachers' understanding and appreciation of what technology can do to enhance their teaching; thus, promoting student learning. Technology in the 21st century classroom, if implemented appropriately, should enrich the learning environment by using it effectively as a medium of instruction or a tool to enhance student learning. It should be embedded in the curriculum and flow seamlessly with the content.
             
              The significance of teacher education for the effective implementation of technology and student-centered learning environment in K-12 classrooms
             
              According to Norman (1997), appropriate design for education technology supports the teacher-student relationship by enabling teachers to create student-centered learning environments. Computer technology offers attributes that allow a shift toward problem-based learning and a chance for students to learn in the ways they learn best. Teachers will be able to propose more ambitious challenges, tailor guidance to individual student and team needs, and give more detailed evaluation. Integrated classroom tools should support creative, collaborative work among students and teachers. However, the way teachers choose to use technology is ultimately based on their knowledge and skill level in technology which brings about the significance of teachers' training in technology.
             
              Many educator, parents and students believe integrating technology in education seemed to be the answer to school restructuring in order to improve educational outcomes. They equate high-tech classroom environment to high-quality education. According to the Quality Educational Data's 1997 Educational Technology Trends report, billions of dollars are spent in computer hardware and software in the nation's kindergarten through twelve grade classrooms (Dyrli, 1998). While many barriers to technology use exist, the national survey conducted by the Milken Exchange on Education Technology stated currently the biggest barrier to schools in effectively using technology are the teachers' lack of understanding and skill in using technology and the lack of quality, informed technology planning by educators. This report indicated teachers' and school administrators' inability to employ technology effectively to promote student learning will result in the waste of billions of dollars being invested in educational technology (Fulton, 1998). Thus, it is important to educate school administrators the importance of empowering teachers to provide the best education for every student by training teachers to use technology effectively to promote student learning (Milone, 1998).
             
              Meanwhile, in light of all the changes in the classrooms due to the impact of technology, many inservice teachers feel that they have not had adequate training to help them use technology effectively. According to Bradshaw's article, teachers' concerns about technology vary broadly. Many teachers admit they know very little about computers and are not interested in learning (Bradshaw, 1997). While others may try to seek new uses for technology in the classroom but do not have sufficient technical support. They see the value of technology but they feel frustrated because they are not trained to use these resources in the classroom setting (Faison, 1996). For the enthusiastic teachers who want to learn, staff development in technological skills as well as alternative classroom management skills and sufficient technical and administrative support are essential to the success of effective use of technology in the classroom. For the retiring teachers who are expected to be replaced by more than 2 million new teachers, integrating technology in the teacher education programs is vital to the success of the envisioned 21st century classrooms (NCATE, 1997). According to the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), the most obvious place to provide training in effective use of technology and to promote student-centered learning environment is in the nation's teacher education programs. It is the most direct and cost-effective way to educate teachers about technology.
             
              According to the NCATE, when funding for resources is made available, most funds are spent on hardware and software, not on training. Thus, teacher education faculty also lacks the knowledge and skill to incorporate technology into their own teaching. They fail to model instructional technology use in their professional education courses because they are not equipped to do so. Students of teacher education programs, therefore, lack the necessary skills to lead the 21st century classroom.
             
              Willingness to change in the current education system is the key if teacher preparation programs are to serve the needs of schools. Colleges and universities need to improve technology accessibility to faculty and students throughout the system. More funding needs to be allocated toward the much needed technology training for professors as well as to increase technical support to faculty members who are seeking help to incorporate technology into their courses. In addition, faculty needs the support and recognition from their department administrators and to allow faculty the time as well as the necessary resources to redesign the course curriculum in order to incorporate technology (Hill & Somers, 1996).
             
              In conclusion, the key to the success of technology in the classroom as well as implementing student-center learning environments depend on the level of training teachers have. Technology itself is merely a tool to support development of programs; programs which teachers are expected to develop. Thus, teachers must be well trained and have sufficient support to implement technology in their classroom. With the combination of learning and experiencing the concept of student-centered learning environment, integrating technology in the teacher preparation programs, training of inservice K-12 teachers as well as faculty in higher education, preservice teachers will have the necessary knowledge and skills to implement the integration of technology in the 21st century classroom. Well trained preservice teachers also have the potential to be leaders in the technological revolution that is taking place in the traditional classrooms by modeling effective use of technology. We live in a technology-driven world and the need of instructional technology must not be ignored. In order to accomplish the vision of implementing technology in the classrooms, colleges of education must be committed to sustained funding in establishing and maintaining comprehensive instructional technology sound teacher education programs. If the goal of education is truly intended to be one of improved student learning at any level, this investment must be made.
Teacher Essay 
+2
Referencess:

Bradshaw, L. K. (1997). Technology-supported change: A staff development opportunity. NASSP
Bulletin, 81(593), 86-92.

Carter, D. S. G. (1997). Information and communication technology in the professional practice of beginning teachers. Journal of Education for Teaching, 23(3), 294-296.

Dyrli, O. E. (1998). Stats making news. Technology & Learning, 18(8), 82.

Faison, C. L. (1996). Modeling instructional technology use in teacher preparation: Why can't we
wait. Educational Technology, 36(5), 57-59.

Fulton, K. (1998). Technology fluency. Milken Exchange. Retrieved from June 19, 1999 from the
World Wide Web: http://www.milkenexchange.org/s3/s3a/tf_intro.shtml

Hill, R. B. & Somers, J. A. (1996). A process for initiating change: Developing technology goals
for a college of education. Journal of Teacher Education, 47(4), 300-306.

International Society for Technology in Education (1997). National educational technology
standards. Retrieved June 19, 1999 from the World Wide Web: http://www.iste.org/Resources/Projects/TechStaamdards/NETS/

Malone, M. N. (1998). Make them believers. Technology & Learning, 18(7), 44-45.

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (1997). Technology and the new
professional teacher: Preparing for the 21st century classroom report. Retrieved May 26, 1999
from the World Wide Web: http://www.ncate.prg/projects/tech/TECH.HTM

Norman, K. (1997). Teaching in the switched on classroom: An introduction to electronic
education and hypercourseware. Retrieved September 28, 1999 from the World Wide Web: http://www.lap.umd.edu/SOC/sochome.html
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