Essay Topics
Types of Essays
Essay Checklist
Word Counter
Readability Score
Essay Rewriter
Both the people of the United States and most of Mexico celebrate the holiday Christmas. Although this holiday is celebrated by both countries, each of their cultures have created their own traditions, making Christmas celebrations in the United States very different than Christmas celebrations in Mexico. The United States, like Mexico, tends to grace their homes with Christmas spirited decor. While many in the U.S. like to show their spirit with a highly traditional Christmas pine tree, Mexicans tend to focus on the true meaning, adorning their dining rooms with nativity sets. They ussually set these up so they can take time to remember the reason in which christians celebrate the day. In order to prepare for the day of symbolic commemoration of Christmas night, we have the Posadas. These celebrations are a Novena or nine days before the 24th which is the Noche Buena or Holy Night . (In America, they call this night, Christmas Eve.) The nine days, starting on the 16th represent Mary's nine months of pregnancy with the baby Jesus. The Posada begins with the procession of the pilgrims. At the beginning is Joseph holding Mary's hand as she ride on the donkey. Each family, in every neighborhood, will plan for a Posada to be held around the 16th. The Peregrinos, or neighborhood adults and children, will ask for lodging in three different houses but only the third one will allow them in. This represents the struggle Mary and Joseph went through to find an innkeeper on the birth of Jesus Christ. The third house will be the house that is supposed to have the Posada for that evening. Once the innkeepers let them in, the group of guests comes into the home and they all kneel around the Nativity scene. They often say a prayer or count their blessings. Th comedic versions of Posadas are called Pastorelas, which are set up like theatrical representations of the shepherds on their way to see baby Jesus. They must follow the star in the East to get there, but there will be many obstacles, set by the other actors beforehand, for them to overcome. Many people enjoy taking part in the re-enactment of the birth of Christ, but for people who, for whatever the reason, can't celebrate my dressing up, they carry a nativity scene from house to house. The Nativity scene is not put away until almost two months later, with a party on that day. The day is called "El dia de la Candelaria" or day of the Candle or Light, and also known as the Day of Purification. Pinitas are not unusual to be seen at any fiesta in Mexico, but they're especially not rare on Christmas. They are filled usually with unwrapped hard candy and small toys for the children of the family. The traditional flower is the same in both countries: the poinsettia. The poinsettia is also popular around the season because of it's red bloom and green stem. They take tradition very seriously in Mexico. While here in America, most families aren't traditional at all or they may just start their own traditions. We get a break from our daily, sometimes hectic, lives during this season. But that time is used mostly to shop and buy presents, or make arrangements for Christmas day. With Americans being so busy, there's no way we could celebrate Christmas as elaborately or as long of time as the Mexican culture likes to do. Lately because of the influence of Western culture, some of these traditions have been modified. For example, some Mexicans celebrate the Posadas by having nine parties in different friends' homes before Christmas. Like the United States, most stores and government institutions in Mexico, including public schools, are closed around two weeks before and after the Christmas holiday. Some Mexicans use this time wisely to go on vacation or spend more time with their family. This is a result of Western infleunces. Santa Clause is huge in most countries, including the United States, but in Mexico, Santa Clause is new to part of their tradition. Children still receive gifts from the Three Wise Men on January 6th, but only if they've proved to have behaved themselves in the past year. A few days before January 5th, the children make lists of what they would want to receive from the Three Wise Men. With their family, they go into the center of the town to tie their letters onto some balloons and send them into the sky. Santa Clause gifts are given only by more modern families fo the children. Food is also a big part of both culture's celebration. Tamales, sweet fritters, and hot chocolate are prepared in time for the celebrations. Before the season is over, family and friends gather to share the Rosca de Reyes , which is a traditional wreath-shaped bread that is made only during the first days of January. It is served with chocolate and tamales. Inside, there are very small figures of baby Jesus and others from the nativity scene. Some families give prizes to the first to find a baby Jesus figurine. They also hold a Candelaria day, which is presented for the winner of the baby Jesus. Church is also a big part of the season. At midnight of Christmas Eve, there are masses that are called Misa de Gallo. After dinner, the adults usually exchange presents. I am amazed there are so many differences in culture for the same celebration. I thought other countries, including Mexico, found Christmas to be another hectic holiday, filled with annoying family members and marketing ads for sales. I'm happy to think that Mexico is one of the few countries that celebrates Christmas for what the Christians believe it it, the birth of our savior and our lord, Jesus Christ.
Essay Writing Checklist
The following guidelines are designed to give students a checklist to use, whether they are revising individually or as part of a peer review team.
Introduction
  • Is the main idea (i.e., the writer's opinion of the story title) stated clearly?
  • Is the introductory paragraph interesting? Does it make the reader want to keep on reading?
Body Paragraph
  • Does each body paragraph have a clear topic sentence that is related to the main idea of the essay?
  • Does each body paragraph include specific information from the text(including quoted evidence from the text, if required by the instructor)that supports the topic sentence?
  • Is there a clear plan for the order of the body paragraphs (i.e., order of importance, chronology in the story, etc.)?
  • Does each body paragraph transition smoothly to the next?
Conclusion
  • Is the main idea of the essay restated in different words?
  • Are the supporting ideas summarized succinctly and clearly?
  • Is the concluding paragraph interesting? Does it leave an impression on the reader?
Overall Essay
  • Is any important material left unsaid?
  • Is any material repetitious and unnecessary?
  • Has the writer tried to incorporate "voice" in the essay so that it has his/her distinctive mark?
  • Are there changes needed in word choice, sentence length and structure, etc.?
  • Are the quotations (if required) properly cited?
  • Has the essay been proofread for spelling, punctuation, grammar, etc.?
  • Does the essay have an interesting and appropriate title?
Feliz Navidad or Merry Christmas?: A Comparison of Christmas Traditions
Trending Essay Topics
Explore today's trending essay topics:
Reference
Feel free to use content on this page for your website, blog or paper we only ask that you reference content back to us. Use the following code to link this page:
Terms · Privacy · Contact
Essay Topics © 2017

Feliz Navidad Or Merry Christmas?: A Comparison Of Christmas Traditions

Words: 980    Pages: 4    Paragraphs: 19    Sentences: 57    Read Time: 03:33
Highlight Text to add correction. Use an editor to spell check essay.
              Both the people of the United States and most of Mexico celebrate the holiday Christmas. Although this holiday is celebrated by both countries, each of their cultures have created their own traditions, making Christmas celebrations in the United States very different than Christmas celebrations in Mexico.
             
              The United States, like Mexico, tends to grace their homes with Christmas spirited decor. While many in the U. S. like to show their spirit with a highly traditional Christmas pine tree, Mexicans tend to focus on the true meaning, adorning their dining rooms with nativity sets. They ussually set these up so they can take time to remember the reason in which christians celebrate the day.
             
              In order to prepare for the day of symbolic commemoration of Christmas night, we have the Posadas. These celebrations are a Novena or nine days before the 24th which is the Noche Buena or Holy Night . (In America, they call this night, Christmas Eve. ) The nine days, starting on the 16th represent Mary's nine months of pregnancy with the baby Jesus.
             
              The Posada begins with the procession of the pilgrims. At the beginning is Joseph holding Mary's hand as she ride on the donkey.
             
              Each family, in every neighborhood, will plan for a Posada to be held around the 16th. The Peregrinos, or neighborhood adults and children, will ask for lodging in three different houses but only the third one will allow them in. This represents the struggle Mary and Joseph went through to find an innkeeper on the birth of Jesus Christ. The third house will be the house that is supposed to have the Posada for that evening.
              Once the innkeepers let them in, the group of guests comes into the home and they all kneel around the Nativity scene. They often say a prayer or count their blessings.
              Th comedic versions of Posadas are called Pastorelas, which are set up like theatrical representations of the shepherds on their way to see baby Jesus. They must follow the star in the East to get there, but there will be many obstacles, set by the other actors beforehand, for them to overcome.
             
              Many people enjoy taking part in the re-enactment of the birth of Christ, but for people who, for whatever the reason, can't celebrate my dressing up, they carry a nativity scene from house to house.
             
              The Nativity scene is not put away until almost two months later, with a party on that day. The day is called "El dia de la Candelaria" or day of the Candle or Light, and also known as the Day of Purification.
             
              Pinitas are not unusual to be seen at any fiesta in Mexico, but they're especially not rare on Christmas. They are filled usually with unwrapped hard candy and small toys for the children of the family.
             
              The traditional flower is the same in both countries: the poinsettia. The poinsettia is also popular around the season because of it's red bloom and green stem.
             
              They take tradition very seriously in Mexico. While here in America, most families aren't traditional at all or they may just start their own traditions. We get a break from our daily, sometimes hectic, lives during this season. But that time is used mostly to shop and buy presents, or make arrangements for Christmas day. With Americans being so busy, there's no way we could celebrate Christmas as elaborately or as long of time as the Mexican culture likes to do.
             
              Lately because of the influence of Western culture, some of these traditions have been modified. For example, some Mexicans celebrate the Posadas by having nine parties in different friends' homes before Christmas.
             
              Like the United States, most stores and government institutions in Mexico, including public schools, are closed around two weeks before and after the Christmas holiday. Some Mexicans use this time wisely to go on vacation or spend more time with their family. This is a result of Western infleunces.
             
              Santa Clause is huge in most countries, including the United States, but in Mexico, Santa Clause is new to part of their tradition. Children still receive gifts from the Three Wise Men on January 6th, but only if they've proved to have behaved themselves in the past year. A few days before January 5th, the children make lists of what they would want to receive from the Three Wise Men. With their family, they go into the center of the town to tie their letters onto some balloons and send them into the sky. Santa Clause gifts are given only by more modern families fo the children.
             
              Food is also a big part of both culture's celebration. Tamales, sweet fritters, and hot chocolate are prepared in time for the celebrations. Before the season is over, family and friends gather to share the Rosca de Reyes , which is a traditional wreath-shaped bread that is made only during the first days of January. It is served with chocolate and tamales. Inside, there are very small figures of baby Jesus and others from the nativity scene. Some families give prizes to the first to find a baby Jesus figurine. They also hold a Candelaria day, which is presented for the winner of the baby Jesus.
             
              Church is also a big part of the season. At midnight of Christmas Eve, there are masses that are called Misa de Gallo. After dinner, the adults usually exchange presents.
             
              I am amazed there are so many differences in culture for the same celebration. I thought other countries, including Mexico, found Christmas to be another hectic holiday, filled with annoying family members and marketing ads for sales.
              I'm happy to think that Mexico is one of the few countries that celebrates Christmas for what the Christians believe it it, the birth of our savior and our lord, Jesus Christ.
Christmas Essay Informative Essay 
Tip: Use our Essay Rewriter to rewrite this essay and remove plagiarism.
Next Holiday Essay: My Christmas Gift
Next Informative Essay: A History Of The Thanksgiving Holiday
Next Christmas Essay: My Christmas Gift

Add Notes

Have suggestions, comments or ideas? Please share below. Don't forget to tag a friend or classmate.
clear
Formatting Help
Submit